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a selected 

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juvenile 
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)EPARTMENT Of HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE • Social Security Administration • Children's Bureau 



1953 



J,;UVENILE DELINQUENCY 

•CauseB - Prevention - Treatment 
An Annotated Bitliography 



Compiled "by the 
U S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Litrary. 



U S DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 
Social Security Administration - - Children's Bureau 

Revised, August 1953 



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FOREWORD 



The need to find ways of combating Juvenile delinquency- 
is assuming new urgency and importance for us all. During 
the past few years an increasingly large number of our young 
people have "been coming before the courts. During the next 
few years, when there will be more boys and girls of Juvenile - 
court age than ever before, this trend may become most acute. 
Certainly there will be more young people to help keep out 
of trouble. Those who are in conflict with the law will 
need help if their delinquency is not to become a permanent 
pattern of behavior. 

How are we to face this problem? 

Increased knowledge and understanding will better pre- 
pare us to deal with it than we have been able to do previously. 
This bibliography is intended to extend this knowledge and under- 
standing. Prepared primarily for professional workers, it 
should be useful also to the layman oriented to social problems 
and concerns. The books, research studies, pamphlets, and 
articles listed here represent up-to-date thinking on matters 
of cause, prevention, and treatment of Juvenile delinquency. 



MARTHA M. ELIOT, M.D. 
Chief, Children's Bureau 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

£SS2 

SENEEAL . 1 

INCIDENCE 7 

CAUSES 8 

CHARACTERISTICS I3 

PREVENTION I6 

General I6 

Techniques I8 

The Role of the School 20 

Treatment 23 

General 23 

Clinics 26 

Courts 28 

Detention, . 31 

Institutions 32 

Police 36 

Protatlon and Parole 37 

STATE AND LOCAL ORGANIZATION FOR DELINQUENCY CONTROL . 38 

BIBLIOGRAPHIES 40 

AUTHOR INDEX i^2 



Note ; This hlbliography Is selective rather than ccmprehensive, with 
emphasis placed on recent hooks and articles 



GENERAL 



Abi-ahamsen, David: WHO ARE THE GUILTY? A S'aMsY OF EDUCATION AMD 
CRIME. Rlnehart & Co., Inc., N.Y., 1952. 3^ PP. 

Considers the close relationship between mental illitess and 
delinquency and points out how such illness can he remedied 
by special psychiatric treatment and proper educational meas- 
xires . Urges a long-range program of education in the hcaae end 
school as a meeois of preventing delinquency and crime. 

Banay, Ralph S.: YOUTH IN DIBPAIR. Coward -McCann, Inc., N.Y., 19kd. 
239 pp. - • ..■ ' "' 

A study of causes, incidence, characteristics, treatment/ 
and prevention of Juvenile delinquency. Includes a bibliog- 
raphy. 

Children's Bureau, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare: SOiyE, FACTS ABOUT JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. (C.B. Pub. No. 3*^0) 
U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 1953- l6 pp. 

A compilation ofssfetjng factual material about Juvenile de- 
linquency, including data on the number of young peopile who get 
into trouble with the law each year, what happens to them, and 
what services are available to help them change their delinquent 
behavior . 

Children's Bureau, j/u.S. Department of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare?: UNDERSTANDING JUVENILE DELINQUEIWY. (C.B. Pub. No. 300, 
revT) U. S. Gov't Print. Off., 19^9. ^9 PP. 

Discusses the causes, prevention, and treatment of juvenile 
delinquency . 

"Correcting Basic Concepts of Juvenile Delinquency." THE TJERVOUS ' 
CHILD, Vol. 6, Oct. 19^7. Entire issue. 

Includes: Conflict in Delinquency Control, by Sherwood Norman; 
Is Juvenile Delinquency a Psychiatric Problem? by J. Louise 
Despert; Roots of Delinquency, by James S . Wallerstein; An 
Elementaristic Approach to the Understanding and Treatment of 
pelinquency, by. S . R. Slavson;. The Psychiatric Treatment of a 
Juvenile Delinquent, by Simon Doniger; and The Socialized Delin- 
quent by Rudolf Hirschberg. 



- 1 - 



DeEoer, Louis: "The White House Conference Loolcs at Delinquency." 
FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 15, Mar. 1951. Pp. hO-kh. 

Presents the findings of the conference regarding "rebel- 
lious "behavior," and its specific recommendations on juvenile 
delinquency . 

Elliott, Matel A.: CRIME DJ MODERN SOdETY. Harper & Brothers, 
New York, 1952. Ql^ PP. 

Includes chapters on the extent and distribution of crime; 
biological, mental and emotional factors in crime; social re- 
lationships and economic factors in crime; and crime pre- 
vention on the juvenile level. 

Galdston, lago: "A Medical and Social Critizue of Delinquency." 
MENTAL HYGIENE, Vol. 32, Oct. 19^+8. pp. 529-538. 

Analyzes the factors associated with delinquency and recommends 
ways, of meeting the problem of Juvenile delinquency. 

Garrison, Earl C: PSYCHCLCGY OF ADOLESCENCE, (i^th ed.) Prentice- 
Hall, Inc., New York, 1951. 510 pp. 

Discusses growth, development, and guidance of adolescents. 
Includes a chapter on juvenile delinquency. 

"Juvenile Delinquency." ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCE, Vol. 26l, Jan. 19^9- Entire issue. 

Includes: Statistics of Juvenile Delinquency in the United 
States, by Edward E. Schwertz; The Family and Juvenile Delin- 
quency, by Harry M. Shulman; The Neighborhood and Child Con- 
duct, by Henry D. McKay; Organization for Delinquency Control, 
by Lowell J. Carr; An Expericient in Prevention of Delinquency, 
by Edwin Powers; Foster Heme Care for Delinquent Children; by 
Ruth Gilpin; Children and Youth in Criminal Court, by Paul 
W. Tappem; Institutions for Juvenile Delinquents, by John B. 
Costello; The Detention Home, by Shen*-ood Norman; Children in 
our Jails, by Austin H. MacCormick; and The Juvenile Court as an 
Institution, by Frederick W. Klllian. 

"Juvenile Delinquency: A Challenge to Concerted Action Now and After 
the War." SURVEY I-IIDMONTHLY, Vol. 80, Mar. 19^^. Special issue 

A group of articles dealing with various aspects of juvenile 
delinquency written by specialists in the field. 

"Juvenile Delinquency in the War Period." Prepared in cooperation 
with the Members of the Socelty for the Prevention of Crime. 
JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY, New York, Vol. l6, Oct. 19^2. 
Entire issue. 

Includes: The Juvenile Court in Wartime, by Gustav L. 
Schramm; Coping with Wartime Delinquency, by Eleanor T. Glueck; 
and Wartime Juvenile Delinquency in England and Some Notes on 
English Juvenile Courts, by Margery Fry. 



- 3 - • 

"Juvenile Delinquency Issue." THE CHILD, Vol. 17, Dec. 1952. En- 
tire issue. 

Includes: What Do We Want for our Delinquent Children? by 
Martha M, Eliot; Focus on Delinquency, ty Bertram M. Beck; 
Eyewitnesses to the Toll of Delinquency: Juvenile Court, hy 
Leo B. Blessing, Detention, hy Steplian H. Kheisal, Police, by 
L. D. Morrison, and Training School, by Lawson J. Veney; and 
Communities Act Against Delinquency, by Douglas H. MacNeil. 

Lunden, Walter A.: SYSTEMATIC SOURCE BOOK IN JUVENILE DELIWQUEKCY. 
(Rev. ed.) University of Pittsburgh, Pittsbiurgh, 1938. 390 pp. 

Source material arranged by subjects with selected refer- 
ences, statistical data, graphs, charts, and factual material. 

Mihanovich, Clement S.: PRINCIPLES OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. Bmice 
Publishing Co., Milwaukee, 1950. 138 PP- 

Analyzes the problem of juvenile delinquency and considers 
its causes and ways and means of preventing and treating it. 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvepile Delinquency: 
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ACTION BY THE PANELS OF THE NATIOJIAL CONFERENCE 
ON PREVENTION AND COIITROL OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. 'U. S. Gov't 
Print. Off., Washington, 19^7. 136 pp. 

Summaries of the reports of 15 of the panels. Individual panel 
reports are listed under appropriate headings . 

National Probation Association: DEALING WITH DELINQUENCY. YEARBOOK, 
1940. Marjorie Bell, ed. The Association, New York, 19^0. 3^1 pp. 

Includes: Organizing a Community for Delinquency Prevention, 
by Fred A Romano; Juvenile Courts in the Light of the White . 
House Conference, by Elsa Castendyck; How Some Delinquents 
Turned Out, by V. Lome Stewart; Federal Experience With the 
Youthful Offender, by Arthur W. James; The Value of Case Work to 
the Probationer, by Robert C . Taber; The Contribution of Group 
Work to Case V/ork with Delinquents, by Charles E, Hendry; and 
The Psychiatrist's Role in the Treatment of the Delinquent, by 
George E. Gardner, 

National Probation Association: DELINQUENCY MD THE COMMUNITY IN V/Jl- 
TIME. YEARBOOK, 19U-3. Marjorie Bell, ed. The Association, New 
York, 19^. 307 pp. 

Includes: The Federal Program for Social Protection, by 
Eliot Ness; The Juvenile Court in a War Industries Area, by 
Max Spelke; The Impact of the War on Family Life, by Frieda 
Romalis; Delinquency or Recreation, by Ernest W. Burgess; 
Communication Lines between the Children's Court and the Train- 
ing School, by Harold F. Strong; Foster Homes for Aftercare, by 
Harvey L. Long; Children in Jail, by Roy Casey, and Psychiatric 
Aspects of Criminal Behavior, by Edmond F. Sassin. 



National Protation and Parole Association: AIjVMCIS IN UNDERSTANDING 
THE OFFENDER. YEARBOOK, 1950. Marjorie Bell, ed. The 
Asaociatlon, New York, 1951- 312 pp. 

Includes :The Standard Juvenile Court Act, 19^9, ^y Justine 
Wise Polier; Conserving Family Life through a Specialized Court, 
■fay Elvood F. Melson; The Role of, a Citizens Advisory Council 
in a Juvenile Court Program, hy Charles H. Bos well; Social 
Reeducation in an Institutional Setting, ty S . R. Slavson; 
The Correctional Institution fi'om the Viewpoint of the Social 
Agency, "by Dorothy L. Book; Relationship of the Correctional 
Institution to Community Agencies, by Charles W. Leonard; 
Statewide Organization of Prohation Services, "by Richard T. 
Smith; Practical Aspects of Casework InParole Supervision, by 
Thomas J. McHugh; and Psychological Techniques in Probation and 
Parole Work, by Louis D. Cohen. 

National Probation and Parole Association: THE COMMUNITY AND THE 
CORRECTIONAL PROCESS. YEARBOOK, 1951. Marjorie Bell, ed. 
The Association, New York, 1952. 293 pp. 

Includes: The Functions of Police and Children's Courts, 
by Alfred J. Kahn; Casework in the Juvenile Court, by Harold 
R. Muntz; The Juvenile Court as a State Responsibility, by 
William N. Macl^y; Limitations in the Traditional Approach 
to Delln(iuency, by Edwin J. Lukas; The Role of the Schools 
in Heading Off Delinquency, by Mark Roser; A Modem Foundation 
for the Casework Services of a Community, by Ernest F. Witte; 
and Relation of Federal to State Delinquency Programs, by Mil- 
dred Arnold. 

National Probation and Parole Association: REDIRECTING THE DELIN- 
QUENT. YEARBOOK, 19^^?. Marjorie Bell, ed. The Association, 
New York, 19^8. 336 pp. 

Includes: Motion Pictures and Radio as Factors in Child 
Behavior, by Harold E. Jones; The Effects of Radio and Motion 
Pictures on Children's Behavior, by Franklin Fearing; The 
Community's Responsibility for Children's Motion Picture Enter- 
tainment, by Ruth B. Hedges; The Police and the Delinquent 
Child, by Lawrence D. Morrison; and Group Study and Treatment 
of Children, by Lillian J. Johnson. 

Pea:.'ce, J. D. W.: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: A SHORT TEXT -BOOK ON THE 
MEDICAL ASPECTS OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. C as ell and Co., Ltd., 
London, 1952. 396 pp. 

Discusses the nature and causes of Juvenile delinquency, 
describes and illustrates with case histories different clin- 
ical groups, and considers various forms of prevention and 
treatment . 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE . MIDCENTURY WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON CHILDREN AND 
YOUTH. Health Publications Institute, Inc., Raleigh, N.C., 1951 

363 pp. 

The report of Conference sessions held In Washington, D.C., De- 
cemher 3-7, 1950, Includes summaries of the opinions of two work 
groups under the titles: "The Law, the Courts, and the Protective 
Services," and "Children Who Rebel." Also includes sunmaries of 
the opinions of two panels,' "The Child in Conflict with the Lav-- 
Implications for Him, for His Family, aod for the Community," and 
"Causes of Conflict Between Youth and Adult." 

Reckless, Walter C: THE CRIME PROBLEM. Applet on-Century-Crofts, Inc., 
New York, 1950. 537 PP. 

Designed as "A basic oriientation to the study of criminal be- 
havior and to the control, treatment, and prevention of crime in 
the United States." Includes chapters op Juvenile delinquency, pro- 
' bation, the correctional institution as a treatment center, parole 
and prevention of crime and delinquency. Selected readings are 
listed at the end of each chapter. 

Reckless, Walter C, and Smith, Mapheus: JUTENILE DELINQUENCY. McGraw 
Hill Book Co., New York, 1932. 4l2 pp. ■. , 

A detailed study of causes, treatment, and pi-evention of Juve- 
nile delinquency. Includes chapters on physical and mental 
traits, social backgrounds of delinquents, truancy and school mal- 
, adjustment, clinical study of causation. Juvenile court, and in- 
stitutional care, 

SOCIAL WORK YEAR BOOK, 1951: A DESCRIPTION OF ORGANIZED ACTIVITIES IN 
SOCIAL WORK AND IN RELATED FIELES. Edited by Margaret B. 
H-i^dges. .(Eleventh Issue.) American Association of Social Workers, 
■ New York, 1951. 696pp. (Published biennially.) 

Among the 73 topical articles there are several that are con- 
cerned, at least to some degree, with the broad problem of delin- 
quency. These articles, written by authorities, deal with such 
subjects as child welfare, guidance, and counseling; Juvenile and 
domestic relations courts; recreation; mental hygiene; settlements 
and neighborhood centers; school health services; and youthful 
offenders. A selected bibliography is given at the end of each 
of these articles, 

Stott, D. H.: SATING CHILDREN FROM DELINQUENCY. University of London 
Press, Ltd., London, 1952. ,266 pp. 

Considers various ways of preventing and treating Juvenile de- 
. linquency. 

Taft, lonald R.: CRIMINOLOGY: AN ATTEMPT AT A SYNTHETIC INTERPRETATION 
WITH A CULTURAL EMPHASIS. Macmlllan Company, New York, 19^+2. 708 pp. 
Part IV --"The Treatment of the Juvenile Delinquent and Crime Pre- 
vention," pp. 559-675, Includes a discussion of the Juvenile 
court and related movements, probation, institutions for Juvenile 
delinquents, erpertmental new penology, and prevention of crime. 



- 6 - 

Tappan, Paul W.: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 
New York, 19^9. 613 pp. 

An objective analysis of juvenile delinquency in which the 
author emphasizes the psychological and sociological factors that 
influence behavior. Considers the nature and extent of delinquency, 
causes of delinquent "behavior, the delinquent in court, probation, 
the role of social work, juvenile detention, and the prevention of 
delinquency. Includes a bibliography. 

Teeters, Negley K., and Eeinemann, John Otto: THE CHALLENGE OF DELIN- 
QUENCY. Prentice -Hall, Inc., New York, 1950. 819 pp. 

Discusses the problem of juvenile delinquency — its scope, 
causes, treatment, and prevention -- and considers the community's 
responsibility in preventing delinquency. Includes a bibliography. 

Thurston, Henry W.: CONCERNING JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: PROGRESSIVE 

CHANGES IN OUR PEESPECTr\/ES , Columbia University Press, New York, 
19^2. 236 pp. 

Considers the causes of juvenile delinquency and the treatment 
of young delinquents by the courts and in the community. 

United Nations, Department of Social Affairs, Division of Social Wel- 
fare: CO^ffAEATIVE SURVEY ON JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: PART 1, 
NORTH AMERICA. United Nations, New York, 1952. 132 pp. 

Part One of a worldwide study of Juvenile delinquency. Con- 
siders the scope of the problem, community services, courts and 
agencies with Jurisdiction over Juveniles, programs for the 
treatment and prevention of juvenile delinquency. 

U. S. Congress, Senate, Committee on Education and Labor, Subcommittee 
on Wartime Health and Education: WARTIME HEALTH AND EDUCATION. 
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: I. HEARINGS, 78th CONGRESS, 1st SESSION, 
PURSUANT TO S. PJB. jk, A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AN INVESTIGATION 
OF THE EDUCATIONAL Alffii PHYSICAL FITNESS OF THE CIVILIAN POPULATION 
AS RELATED TO NATIOimL DEFENSE. PART 1, Washington, D.C. U. S. 
Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 19^. 600 pp. 

U. S. Congress, Special Committee to Investigate Organized Crime in 
Interstate Commerce: JUVEI\fIIxE DELINQUENCY (Committee Print, Blst 
Cong., 2d sess.) U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 1950. 25U pp. 
Includes replies from public officials and authorities on Juve- 
nile delinquency and crime prevention in answer to a series of 
questions on juvenile delinquency which was sent to them by the 
Committee. Also Includes supplementary data and statistics. 

White House Conference on Child Health and Protection. Committee on 

Socially Handicapped -- Delinquency. THE DELINQUENT CHILD: REPORT 
Century Co., New York, 1932. U99 pp. 

The Committee in its report considers the delinquent in re- 
lation to himself, his family, school, church, state and municipal- 
ity, industry, and the community. Recommends ways of meeting the 
problems of delinquency through each of these areas. Includes a 
bibliography. 



- 7 - 

Young, Paulino V.: SOCIAL TREATMENT IN PROBATION AND DELINQUENCY: 
TREATISE AND CASEBOOK FOR COURT WORKERS, PROBATION OFFICERS, 
AND OTHER CHILD WORKERS (2d ed.) McGraw-Hill Book Company, 
New York, 1952. 536 pp. 

Examines the complex social problems and tensions of unad- 
justed American youths, analyzes the work of the Juvenile courts 
and probation departments and discusses the dynamics of social 
therapy with these youths end their parents and the community 
resources available for working with them. P. selected bibliog- 
raphy is given at the end of each chapter. 



INCIDENCE 

Children's Bureau, ^. S. Department of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare7: JUVENILE COURT STATISTICS, 19^6-1949. (Statistical Series 
No. 8) The Bureau. Processed, Washington, 1951. l6 pp. 

Murphy, Fred J.: Shirley, Mary N.: and Wltmer, Helen L.: "The Inci- 
dence of Hidden Delinquency." AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, 
Vol. 1.6, Oct. 1946. pp. 686-696. 

A study of undetected law infractions among ll4 boys . 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON STATISTICS. U. S. Gov't Print. Off.. Washington, 194?. 
25 pp. 

Considers in detail the Importance of statistics In the pre- 
vention and control of juvenile delinquency, the factual basis of 
delinquency statistics, the Federal government and delinquency 
statistics, and delinquency studies made by State and local agen- 
cies, 

Robison, Sophia M.: CAN DELINQUENCY BE MEASURED? Published for the 
Welfare Council of New York City by Columbia University Press, 
New York, 1936. 277 PP. 

A report of a four-year study which examines the term delinquen- 
cy and the characteristics of a juvenile delinquent, inquires into 
the extent of delinquency In New York City, and concludes that 
for the field of juvenile delinquency, index -making is not feasible. 

Schwartz, Edward E.: "Statistics of Juvenile Delinquency in the United 
States." ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF POLITICAL AND SOCIAL 
SCIENCE, Vol. 261, Jan. 19^9. pp. 9-20. 

Sellin, Thorsten: THE CRIMINALITY OF YOUTH. American Law Institute, 
Philadelphia, 19^0. II6 pp. 

A condensation of reports on existing statistical materials re- 
lating to the criminality of youth. These reports were available to 
the Youth Committee of the American Law Institute when it prepared 
the Youth Correction Authority Act and a Youth Court Act. 



CAUSES 



Alexander, Franz, and Healy, William: ROOTS OF CE2ME: PSYCHOANALYTIC 
STUDIES. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1935. 305 PP. 

A study of the causes of delinquency and crime with suggestions 
for their prevention and treatment. 

Barker, Gordon H.: "Family Factors in the Ecology of Juvenile De- 
linquency." JOURNAL OF CRIKENAL LAW AND CRmiNOLOGY, Vol. 30, 
Jan.-Feh. 19li.O. pp. 68I-69I. 

A study of certain family factors in the lives of over 7,000 
hoys and girls whose cases came before the Juvenile Court of 
Chicago . 

Bogen, David: "Juvenile Delinquency and Economic Trend." AMERICAN 
SOCIOLOGICAL REVIEW, Vol. 9, Apr. 19^. PP. 178-184 

An analysis of data from the Los Angeles County Juvenile Court 
showing that Juvenile delinquency increases during a period of 
prosperity and decreases during an economic depression. 

Bovet, L.: PSYCHIATRIC ASPECTS OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. (World 
Health Organization Monograph Series No. 1.) World Health Or- 
ganization, Geneva, 1951. 90 pp. 

A psychological and psychiatric review of the causes, prevention, 
and treatment of Juvenile delinquency, by the consultant in mental 
health of the World Health Organization. 

Bowlby, J.: MATEPJ)JAL CARE AND MHOTAL HEALTH. (World Health Organi- 
zation Monograph Series Wo. 2.) World Health Organization, 
Geneva, 1951. 179 pp. 

Discusses the adverse effects on mental health and personality 
development when the child is deprived of maternal care, and the 
need for adoption, boarding-homes, or group care for children de- 
prived of normal home life. 

Burgess, Ernest W.: "The Economic Factor in Juvenile Delinquency." 
JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL LAW, CRIMINOLOGY, AND POLICE SCIENCE, Vol. 
43, May -June 1952. pp. 29-^2. 

Considers the relationship between low income and Juvenile de- 
linquency. 



- 9 - 

Burt, Cyril: THE YOUNG DELINQUENT, (li-th and rev.^ ed.) Bickley, Kent: 
University of London Press, Ltd., 19^5. 662. pp; 

Considers such aspects of the prohlem of .Juvenile delinquency 
as: hereditary conditions, environmental conditions within and 
outside the home; pathological and developmental physical con- 
ditions; subnormal and supernormal intelligence; temperamental 
conditions; general instahility; and sentiments, complexes and 
neuroses. 

Carr-Saunders, A.M.: Mannheim, - Hermann: and Rhodes, E. C. •: YOUNG 
OFFENDERS: M ENQUIRY UTTO JUVMILE DELINQUENCY. Macmillan 
Company, New York, 19*<-^. l68 pp. 

Presents the results of a study of young offenders in London 
and six provincial cities, made hy the English Home Office in 
• 1938. 

Collis, Arthur T., and Poole, Vera E.: THESE OUR CHILDREN. Victor 
Gollancz, Ltd., London, 1950. 157 pp. 

A study of home life and social environment of children in an 
industrial slum district which emphasizes the prohlems of child 
neglect, juvenile delinquency, and impaired family life. This 
study is "based on ohservations and records of social workers who 
worked in this district . 

Dirksen, Cletus: ECONOMIC FACTORS OF DELINQUEircY. Bruce Publishing 
Co., Milwaukee, 19^. 9^ PP. 

Considers the effect of poor environment, poverty, inadequate 
housing, and associated factors on Juvenile delinquency. 

East, W. Norwood: Stocks, Percy: and Young, H.T.P.: THE ADOLESCENT 
CRIMINAL: A MEDICO -SOCIOLOGICAL STUDY OF 4,000 MALE ADOLESCENTS. 
J. & A. Churchill, Ltd., London, 19*^2. 32? pp. 

A study of U,000 adolescent offenders at the beginning of their 
careers in which particular emphasis has been placed upon the 
factors that contributed to their adolescent crlininality. 

Ferguson, Thomas: THE YOUNG DELH^QUENT IN HIS SOCIAL SETTING: A 
GLASGOW STUDY. Published for the Nuffield Foundation by Oxford 
University Press, London, 1952. 158 pp. 

A study dealing with the incidence and background of delinquency 
among three groups of boys — "ordinary," physically handicapped, 
and mentally handicapped. Presents illustrative case histories 
and data on the convictions of these boys between their eighth 
and eighteenth birthdays. 

Glueck, Sheldon, and Glueck, Eleanor: DELINQUENTS IN THE MAETNG: PATHS 
TO PREVENTION. Harper & Brothers, New York, ,1952. 21^4- pp. 

A simpler version of the findings published by the authors in 
UNRAVELING JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. 



- 10 - 

Glueck, Sheldon, -and Glueclc, Eleanor: IMRAVELIWG JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. 
The Commonwealth Fvmd, New York, 1950. 399 PP. 

An analysis of crime causation "based on research among one 
thousand hoys, five hundred of whom were persistently delinquent, 
while the other five hundred were non-delinquent. In making this 
study such factors as family, school, and community "background, 
physical condition, and intelligence and achievement tests were 
carefully examined. The authors have developed prediction tables 
of delinquency based on the factors which were found to most 
markedly differentiate the delinquents from the non-delinquents . 

Gough, Harrison, G.i and Peterson, Donald E.: "The Identification and 
Measurement of Predispositional Factors in Crime and Delinquency." 
JOTjENAL of CONSULTING PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. l6, June 1952. pp. 207-212. 

Hart, Henry Harper, and Axelrad, Sidney: "The Only-Child Contrasted 
With Delinquents in Large Families ." JOURNAL OF CRIMrNAL LAW 
AND CRIMINOLOGY, Vol. 32, May- June 19ii-l. pp. ij-2-66. 

A study of a group of 37 only children taken from a group of 
300 boys at the New York State Training School for Boys at 
Warwick, New York. 

Hlrsch, Nathaniel D.M.: DYl^IAMIC CAUSES OF JUVENILE CRIME. Sci-Art 
Publishers, Cambridge, Mass., 1937. 250 pp. 

A report of a study made at the Wayne County (Michigan) Clinic 
for Juvenile Delinquency. Includes an investigation of the causal 
factors in 6ok cases. 

Lunden, Walter A: SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC BASIS OF DELINQUENCY AND DEPENDEN- 
CY IN IOWA. Iowa State College, Department of Economics and 
Sociology, Ames, Iowa, 1952. 49 pp. 

A summary of a state-wide investigation into delinquency and 
dependency covering the period from 1925 through 1950. 

Neumeyer, Martin H.: "Delinquency Trends in Wartime." SOCIOLOGY AI© 
SOCIAL RESEARCH, Vol. 29, Mar. -Apr. 19^5. PP. 262-275. 

New York State Board of Social Welfare: THE EFFECTS OF THE WAR ON 
CHILDREN. The Board, Albany, 19^^-3. l89 PP. 

"A compilation of testimony made by hundreds of people repre- 
senting public and private agencies at eight public hearings on 
Juvenile delinquency held throughout the State." 

Page, Leo: THE YOUITG LAG: A STUDY IN CRIME. Faber and Faber, Ltd., 
London, 1950. 320 pp. 

A detailed history of 23 prisoners ranging in age frcm 20 to 
26 years. Includes a discussion of the main causes of serious 
crime and suggestions for preventive measvires . 



. - 11 - 

Reckless, Walter C: THE ETIOLOGY OF DELINQUElif AlID CBIMIWAL BE- 
HAVIOE. (Bulletin Wo. 50) Social Science Research Cpuncil, New 

York, 19^3. 169 pp. 

Designed as a planning report for research in the etiology of 
delinquent and criminal behavior. 

Redl, Fritz: "The Psychology of Gang Formation and the Treatment of 
Juvenile Delinquency." THE PSYCEOAKALYTIC STUDY OF THE CHILD, 
Vol. I, 19U5. International Universities Press, New York, 19^5. 
pp. 367-377." 

Analyzes the group psychological conditions under which delin- 
quent traits are reinforced or counteracted. 

Reiss, Albert J., Jr.: "Unraveling Juvenile Delinquency: II. An 

Appraisal of the Research Methods." AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, 
Vol. 57, Sept. 1951. pp. 115-120. 

A critique of the methods of research used by Sheldon and 
Eleanor Glueck in their booik UNRAVELING JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. 

Ross, Mabel: "Emotional Aspects of Juvenile Delinquency." FEDERAL 
PROBATION, Vol. 15, Sept. 1951. PP. 12-1^. 

Explains the meaning of delinquent behavior and discusses the 
emotional attitudes and reactions of both the child and the adult 
in relation to delinquency. 

Rubin, Sol: "Unraveling Juvenile Delinquency: I. Illusions in a Re- 
search Project Using Matched Pairs." AMERICAN JOUWIAL OF SOC- 
IOLOGY, Vol. 57, Sept. 1951. pp. 107 -lU. 

A critical review of the Glueck research methods and conclusions 
in their book UNRAVELING JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. 

Shaw, Clifford R.: THE JACK ROLLER. Albert Saifer, Philadelphia, 
1951. 212 pp. 

A case study of the life of a delinquent boy. Discusses in 
detail the boy's truancy, vagrancy, and thievery, and emphasizes 
the tremendous influence of environment on the formation of de- 
linquent careers. Recommends rehabilitation through friendly 
counseling and employment opportunities. 

Shaw, Clifford R.: McKay, Henry D.: and McDonald, James F.: BROTHERS 
IN CRUVDE. Albert Saifer, Philadelphia, 1952. 36k- pp. 

A detailed case study pertaining to the social background and 
delinquent careers of. five brothers,. 

Shaw, Clifford R.: McKay, Henry D.: and Others: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 
AND URBAN AREAS. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, I9U2. 
^51 pp. 

A compilation of data from 20 cities shoing how delinquency 
follows the pattern of the jbysical structure and social organi- 
zation of American cities . Points put that delinquency is highly 



- 12 - 

correlated with changes in population, poor housing, poverty, tuber- 
culosis, mental disorders, and adult criminality, 

Shaw, Clifford R.^. and Moore, Maurice E.: THE NATURAL HISTORY OF A 
DELINQUENT CAREER. Albert Saifer, Philadelphia, 1951. 30h pp. 

This study, the second of a series, presents the case history 
of a young male recidi\!fet who was sentenced to a state penal in- 
stitution before his seventeenth birthday. Considers in detail 
the social factors that were involved in the origin and develop- 
ment of this young delinquent's attitudes and behavior. 

Shulman, Harry Manuel: "Intelligence and Delinquency." JOURNAL OF 
CRIMINAL LAW AND CRBmiOLOGy, Vol. 1+1, Mar.- Apr. 1951. pp. 763- 
781. 

Discusses the proportion of mental defectives among delinquents 
compared to the general population, the significant differences 
in general mental ability between delinquents and the general pop- 
ulation, and the relationship between level of intelligence and 
treatability. 

Slawson, John: THE DELINQUENT BOY: A SOCIO -PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDY. 
Richard G, Badger, Publisher, Boston, 1926. kjj pp. 

A study of delinquent boys in four institutions in New York 
State undertaken "to ascertain ^o^ the statistical method the 
contributory strengths of mental, physical, and environmental 
factors to male juvenile delinquency." 

Stott, D.H.: DELINQUENCY AITO HUMAN NATURE. Carnegie United Kingdom 
Trust, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland, 1950. h6o pp. 

A study of 102 delinquent boys, between the ages of 15 and l8, 
who have been committed to an English approved school. Analyzes 
the various causes of delinquency with particular emphasis on 
unsatisfactory parent-child relationships. Includes a series of 
case studies. 

Thrasher, Frederic M.: THE GANG. (2d rev. ed.) University of Chicago 
Press, Chicago, 1936. 605 pp. 

A study of 1,313 gangs in Chicago showing the relation of 
the gang to the problems of Juvenile delinquency and crime. Se- 
lected bibliography, pp. 55^-580. 

Towle, Charlotte: "Some Notes on the War and Adolescent Delinquency: 
A Case Worker's Interpretation." SOCIAL SERVICE REVIEW, Vol. 
17, Mar. 191+3. pp. 67-73. 

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization: 
VAGRANT CHILDREN. The Organization, Paris, 195I. 91 pp. 

A report on the damaging effects of war on children in Austria, 
Germany, Greece and Italy. Considers the psychological and 
social causes of vagrancy and the facilities for reeducating the 
vagrant child. 



- 13 - 

Watten"berg, William V., and Ballstrelrl, James J.; "Gang MembeFShip 
and Juvenile Misconduct J AMERICAN SOCIOLOGICAL BEVIEW, Vol. 15, 
Dec. 1950. pp. lkk'1^2. 

A study of tjie records of 5,.fl78 adolescent. Tjoys contacted on 
complaint by Detroit, police. Shows how boys ibelonging -to gangs 
differed fi'om non-gang. boys. •. 

Whyte, William' F.: STREET CORNER SOCIETY: THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF 

AN ITALIAN SLUM. University of Chicagq. Press, Chicago,- 19^3. 'SBt^ pp. 
A report of a three-and-one-half year stud^r of street corner 
■ gangs. ,. . '■ ••'•■. 

Wiers, Paul: ECONOMIC FACTORS IN MICHIGAN DELINQUENCY. Columbia Uni- 
versity Press, New York, IQ^i^. 5^ pp. 

Analyzes the relationship between various social and economic 
factors and the rate of Juvenile delinquency in Michigan. 



CHARACTERISTICS 



Betke, Mary Angela: DEFECTIVE MORAL REASONING IN DELINQUENCY: A PSY- 
CHOLOGICAL STUDY (Studies in Psychology and iPsychiatry, Catholic 
University of America, V9I. 6 No..'+.) Catholic Uhi'v-ea-sity of 
America Press, Washington, 19^^. 95 PP. 

A study of the difference in reasoning between two groups- of 
boys — delinquent and non-delinquent. . . ' 

Birkeness, Valborg, and Johnson, Harry C: "A Comparative Study of 

Delinquent and Non-Delinquent Adolescents." JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL 
RESEARCH, Vol. k2, Apr. 19^9. pp. 561-572. 

Compares such factors as scholarship, school attendance, soc- 
iological background, and personality characteristics. 

Bowlby, John: , FORTY -FOUR JUVENILE THIEVES: TEEIE CHARACTERS AND HOME- 
LIFE. Bailliere, Tindall & Cox, London, 19^6. 56 pp. 

A study carried on at the London Child Guidance Clinic, during 
the years 1936-39, in which the characters and psychiatric his- 
tories of i4^tj- juvenile thieves were compared with those of kk 
children who did not steal. 

Boynton, Paul L.j and Walsworth, Barrier M.: "Emotionality Test Scores 
of Delinquent and Nondelinquent Girls." JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL AND 
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 38, Jan. 19'+3. pp. 87-92. 

Analyzes the results of a series of tests given to a group of 
delinquent and a group of non-delinquent girls. 



- lu - 

Poll, Edgar A., and Fitch, Kathryn A.: "Social Ccanpetence and Juve- 
nile Delinquents." JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL LAW ANP CEIMINOLOGY, Vol. 
30, May -June 1939. PP. 52-6?. 

A study in which the Vineland Social Matiurlty Scale was admin- 
istered to 91 delinquent boys at the State Home for Boys at 
Jameshurg, New Jersey. Concludes that the social competence of 
delinquents is strikingly below that of normal non-delinquents. 

Burea, M. A.^ and Fertman, M. H.: "Personality Characteristics of 

Juvenile Offenders." JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL LAW AND CEIMINOLOGY, Vol. 
32, Nov. -Dec. 19^1, PP. ^33-^33. 

A comparative study of 3l6 delinquent hoys in the Boys' Industrial 
School at Lancaster, Ohio, and l80 delinquent girls, .in the Girls' 
Industrial School at Delaware, Ohio. 

Jenkins, R. L., and Glickman, Sylvia: "Patterns of Personality Organi- 
zation Among Delinquents." THE NERVOUS CHILD, Vol. 6, July 19^7- 

pp. 329-339. 

A stndy of 300 delinquent hoys committed to the New York State 
Training School for Boys at Warwick, New York, 

Lowrey, Lawson G.: "Delinquent and Criminal Personalities." PERSONAL- 
ITY AND TEE BEHAVIOR DISORDERS, Vol. II, J. McV. Hunt, ed. Ronald 
Press, New York, 19^+^. pp. 79^-821. 

■ Discusses in detail the fact that there are no such entities 
as "delinquent" and "criminal" personalities. 

Mann, Cecil W., and Mann, Helene Powner: "Age and Intelligence of A 
Group of Juvenile Delinquents.." JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL AND SOCIAL 
PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 3^, July 1939. pp. 351-360. 

A study of a group of 1,731 delinquent hoys and girls who ap- 
peared before the Juvenile Hall Clinic of Los Angeles during the 
period 1936-38. 

Merrill, Maud A.: PROBLEMS OF CHILD DELINQUENCY. Houghton Mifflin Co., 
New York, 19^+7. ^03 pp. 

A study in which 300 delinquents, who were Juvenile court cases, 
were compared with a non-delinquent control group matched for 
age, sex, and several environmental factors. The study was made 
to determine how delinquents differ from non-delinquents and how 
they resemble them. 

Mlddleton, Warren C.; and Wright, Robert R.: "A Comparison of a Group 
of Ninth and Tenth Grade Delinquent and Non-Delinquent Boys and 
Girls on Certain Attitude Scales." PEDAGOGICAL SEMINARY AND JOUR- 
NAL OF GENETIC PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 58, Mar. 19^1. pp. 139-150. 

A comparison of certain attitudes expressed by a group of insti- 
tutionalized delinquent boys and girls with those expressed by a 
group of high school students of similar age, intelligence, and 
educational status. 



- 15 - 

Monachesl, Elio D.: "Personality CharacterlsticB of Institutionalized 
and Non-Institutionalized Male Delinquents." JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL 
LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY, Vol. kl. July-Aug. 1950. pp. 167-179- 

Presents data showing hov the personality characteristics of 
these two groups differ. 

Odoroff, M. E., and Harris, Dale B.: "A Study of the Interest-Attitude 
Test Scores of Delinquent and Non-Delinquent Boys." JOURNAL OF 
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 33, Jan. 19^2. pp. 13-23- 

Sheldon, William H.: ^VARIETIES OF DELINQUENT YOUTH: AN' INTRODUCTION 
•TO CONSTITUTIONAL 'PSYCHIATRY. Emil M. Hartl and Eug6ne'McDermott, 
• ''^■collaborators. Harper & Brothers, New York, 19^9- 899 pp. 

A report hased on a study of 200 delinquent "boys in -the Hayden 
••■ Goodwill Inn, a Boston social agency. '*' . 

Wittman, Mary Phyllis, and Huffman, Arthur V.: "A Comparative Study 
• tjf Developmental, Adjustment, and Personality Characteristics of 
Psychotic, Psychoneurotic, Delinquent, and Normally Adjusted Teen 
Aged Youths." PEDAGOGICAL SEMINARY AND JOURNAL OF GENETIC PSY- 
CHOLOGY, Vol. 66, June 19^5- PP- 167-182. 

A study of teen-age patients at the Elgin State Hospital and 
inmates of the State Training Schools, for "boys at St. Charles, 
and for girls at Geneva, Illinois. 



;;l ^:. 



PREVENTION 



General 



Alper, Benedict S.: "Prevention and Control of Delinquency at the 

. International Level." PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF 
' ■ SOCIAL WORE, 19^. Columbia University Press, New York, 19^9. 

, P^. .366-371. 

Diecusses the international interchange of ideas and experience 
in the field of criminology during the past 75 years . 

Ca'uot, P. S. De Q.: "A Long-Term Study of Children: The Cambridge - 
Somerville Youth Study." CEHD. DEVELOPMENT, Vol. 11, June 19^0. 
pp. 143-151. 

Discusses the philosophy, research programi and organization of 
the Cambridge -Somerville Youth Study. 

Carr, Lowell Jullliard: DELINQUENCY CONTROL. (Rev. ed.) Harper & 
Brothers, New York, 1950. 591 pp. 

Analyzes the problem of Juvenile delinquency and outlines pro- 
cedures for dealing with it through"the resources of scientific 
research, skilled technology, social action, and social organization." 

Dobbs, Harrison Allen: "Getting at the Fundamentals of Preventing 
Crime and Delinquency." FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 13, June 19^9. 
pp. 3-9. 

Proposes ways of preventing Juvenile delinquency through re- 
search and experiment, education for greater emotional maturity, 
improved living conditions, recognition of early symptoms of delin- 
quency, euid community responsibility. 

Felix, R. H.: "The Responsibility of the Community for Juvenile Delin- 
quency." PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK, 
19^7. Columbia University Press, New York, 19*^8. pp. 377-383. 

Points out the need for eliminating unhealthy factors in the 
child's home and community In order to successfully prevent delin- 
quency . 

Gibbons, Mary L.: "The Prevention and Treatment of Juvenile Delinquency 
in Wartime." PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL 
WORE, 19'*-3. Columbia University Press, New York, 19^3. pp. 1^9- 
157. 

Tells what New York State did to meet the problem. 

- 16 - 



- 17 - 

Glueck, Sheldon, and Glueck, Eleanor: editors. PREVENTING CEIME: A 
SYMPOSIUM. Mc Graw-Hill Book Co., New' York, 1936'. 509 pp. 

A group of 2k articles on crime -prevention experiments carried 
on In the United States in which emphasis is placed on the underlying 
principles and the variety of approaches to the problem of delin- 
quency prevention. The articles are grouped under the following 
headings: coordinated community programs, school progi-ams, police 
programs, intra -mural guidance programs, extra-mural guidance pro- 
grams, and hoya' clubs and recreation programs. 

"Juvenile Belinc[uency Prevention" JOUENAL OF EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY, 
Vol. 2k, Sept. 1950. pp. 2-51. 

A symposium on the prevention of Juvenile delinquency which in- 
cludes articles on school sia-veys and delinquency prevention, psy- 
chiatric aspects, group psychotherapy, and state and city programs. 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON HOUSING AND JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. 3^ pp.' 
REPORT ON CITIZEN PARTICIPATION. 3^ pp. " ' 
REPORT ON HOME RESPONSIBILITY. 35 PP. 

EEPORT ON RECREATION FOR YOUTH. 93 PP. ' .' ' 

REPORT ON RURAL ASPECTS. 76 pp. ' . ■ 

REPORT ON YOUTH PARTICIPATION, ll^. pp. 
U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 19^7 and 191*8. 

Neumeyer, Martin H.; JUVENILE DELINQUENCY IN MODERN SOCIETY. D. Van 
Nostrand Company, Inc., New York, 19^9. 335 PP. 

Discusses Juvenile delinquency as a social problem and considers 
the elements involved in controlling it. 

New York City Youth Board: REACHING THE UNREACHED: FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS 
OF THE PROGRAM OF THE NEW YORK CITY YOUTH BOARD. The Board, New 
York, 1952. 151 pp. Processed. 

Twelve papers which tell the story of the New York City Youth 
Board and its work in preventing and controlling Juvenile delin- 
quency. .:.■.-• . 

Pennsylvania, Joint State Government Commission, Subcommittee on 

Juvenile Delinquency and Child Welfare: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND 
CHILD WELFARE: A EEPORT. . . TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE COMMON- 
WEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA. The Commission, Harrisburg, Feb. 19'j-9. 

^1 pp. 

Recommendations for meeting the problem of Juvenile delinquency 
through legislation, rehabilitation, and youth guidance clinics . 

Philadelphia Conference for the Prevention and Control of Juvenile 
Delinquency: TEE CONSERVATION OF HUMAN AND SPIRITUAL RESOURCES. 
(2d ed.) Crime Prevention Association of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, 
1950. 93 pp. 

Outlines the program developed by the Conference. 



. - 18 - 

Porterfield, Austin L.: YOUTH IN TROUBLE: STUDIES IN DELINQUENCY AND 
DESPAIR WITH PLANS FOR PREVENTION. The Leo Potishman Foundation, 
Fort Worth, 19^6. 132 pp. 

A comparative study of the delinquencies of college students 
with those of children arraigned in juvenile courts. Recommends 
the development of a community program to meet the problem of de- 
linquency. 

Solomon, Ben: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: PRACTICAL PREVENTION. Youth 
Service, Inc., Peelcskill, N.Y., 19^7. 96 pp. 

Suggests various types of action .for reducing Juvenile delin- 
quency . 

Witmer, Helen Lelandj and Kotinsky, Ruth: editors. PERSONALITY IN THE 
MAKING: THE FACT-FINDING REPORT OF THE MIDCENTURY WHITE HOUSE 
CONFERENCE ON CHILDREN AND YOUTH. Harper & Brother, New York, 
1952. 45*^ pp. 

Part I considers the influence on the development of the healthy 
personality of such factors as: physical limitations, parent-child 
relations, income level> prejudice and discrimination, and re- 
ligion. Part II discusses the role of the various social insti- 
tutions in the development of personality and considers what changes 
are needed in order to more effectively promote the welfare of 
children and youth. ' . 

Young, Leontine R.: "We Call Them Delinquents." FEDERAL PROBATION, 
Vol. 15, Dec. 1951. pp. 8-12. 

Points out that it is the responsibility of the total community -■ 
day care centers, schools, churches, courts, social agencies — to 
find and know its unhappy childr-en so that they may be helped be- 
fore it is too late. 



Techniques 

Applegate, Melbourne S.: HELPING BOYS IN TROUBLE: THE LABIAN IN BOY 
GUIDANCE. Association Press, New York, 1950. 12ij- pp. 

The author describes his 2k years of experience in working with 
problem children. 

Carroll -Abbing, John Patrick: A CHANCE TO LIVE: THE STORY OF THE LOST 
CHILDREN OF THE WAR. Longmans, Green and Co., New York, 1952. 
216 pp. 

Tells the story of the origin and development of the Boys' 
Republic in Italy after World War II. 

Crawford, Paul L.: Malamud, Daniel I.: and Dumpson, James R.: WORKING 
WITH TEEN-AGE GROUPS. Welfare Council of New York City, New York, 
1950. 162 pp. 

A report on the Central Harlem Street Clubs Project setting forth 
the objectives of the Project, the methods used, and the results 
achieved. 



- 19 - 

Minnesota, Youth Conservation Commission, Division of Prevention; 

YOUTH CENTERS: THE CRGAIIIZATION OF A CaaraijITY-tTIDE PROGRMl. The 
Conmission, St. Paul, 1952, 20 pp. Processed. 

Explains the purpose of a Youth Center program and suggests ways 
of organizing, financing, and supervising such a program, 

Oursler, Fulton, and Oursler, Vlill: FATHER FLANAGAN OF BOYS TOWN. 
Doubleday & Company, Inc., Garden City, N.Y., 1949, 302 pp. 

The story of Father Flanagan's life and his work with boys of 
all races, creeds, and colors. Gives case histories to emphasize 
Father Flanagan's belief that "there is no such thing as a bad 
boy." 

Powers^ Edwin, and Witmer, Helen: AN EXPERBIENT IN THE PRETEl^'TIGN OF 
DELINQUENCY: THE CATiBRIDGE-SOMKRVILLE YOUTH STUDY. Columbia Uni- 
versity Press, New York, 1951, 649 pp. 

Part I describes the background and development of the study, made 
in two industrial cities in Massachusetts from 1955-45, in -which 
two groups of "problem boys" or "pre--delinquents" were matched for 
experiment and control purposes. The first group received special 
counseling and aid while the second group received no special 
guidance. Part II evaluates the experiment and makes recommer.dations 
for future programs. 

Robinson, Duane: CHA1\1CE TO BELONG: STORY OF THE LOS AITGELES YOUTH 
PROJECT, 1943-1949. V/oraan» s Press, New York, 1949. 173 pp. 

Tells about the origin, development, administration, and problems 
of the Los Angeles Youth Project. - 

Shanas, Ethel; and Dunning, Catherine E.: RECREATION AND DELINQUENCY: 
A STUDY OF FIVE SELECTED CHICAGO COlIuUNITIES IIADE FOR THE CHICAGO 
RECREATION COMMISSION. Chicago Recreation Commission, 'Chicago, 
1942. 284. pp. 

A study of the relationship between recreation and juvenile de- 
linquency, based upon the analysis of the recreational activities 
of 15,000 boys and 8,000 girls between the ages of 10 and 17. 
For research purposes the children were divided into three groups: 
delinquents having court records, non-delinquents, and unofficial 
delinquents. On the basis -of the findings, the Commission recom- 
mended increased recreational activities. 

Threasher, Frederic M., "The Boy's Club and Juvenile Delinquency." 
AlAERICAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY, Vol. 42, July 1936. pp. 66-30, 
Evaluates the club as a delinquency-preventing agency. 

Wilkins, William D.: "Guidance of the Roughies." UI\IIVERSITY OF PENN- 
SYLVAlilA BULLETIN, Vol. 31, Sept. 1, 1950. pp. 209-217. 

Discusses both the causes of delinquency and its effect upon 
the community and suggests ways of meeting this problem through 
guidance and community organization. 



- 20 - 



T he Role of The School 

Bodin, Nathan: "Do Problem Children Become Delinquents and Criminals?" 
JOi:jRNAL OF CRIMINAL LAYif AND CRIMINOLOGY, Vol., 27, Nov. -Dec. 1936. 
pp. 545-559. 

A follo-w-up study of a small group of problem children in the 
public schools, of . Berkeley, California,, undertaken to determine what 
percentage became delinquents and criminals » 

Bower, i^li M.s "How Can Schools i<ecognize Early Symptoms of Maladjust- 
ment in Children and Youth?" FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 16, June 1952, 
pp. 3-7,. 

Suggests positive steps in preventive mental health which me,y be 
taken by public school administrators, supervisors, and teachers. 

Citizens* Committee on Children of New York City:.. CHILDREN. ABSEJTT FROM 
SCHOOL: A REPORT AND A PROGRAI^jI, The Committee, New York,. 1949. 
1-16 pp. 

A study of children reported for imexplained and frequent non- 
attendance. Points out "that most children referred as possible 
truants represent many problems ajid maladjustments far broader than 
the absence which called them to attention." Includes the Committee's 
recommendations for a comprehensive child-helping program in the 
New York City schools i 

Cox, Rachel Dunaway: "The School Counselor' s Contribution to the Preven- 
tion of Delinquency." FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 14, Mar. 1950, 
pp. 23-28. 

"Delinquency and ulental Hygiene." UNDERSTANDING THE CHILD, Vol. 12, 
Apr. -1943. Entire issue. . ' 

Includes: The Virtues of Delinquent Childr.en, by Fritz Redl; 
Wartime Delinquency: l/j'hat is "the Present Situation? by Elsa 
Castendyck; ViiTiat is the School Psychologist' s Place in a Program 
■ to Prevent Delinquency? by Ethel Cornell; Topics for .Teachers' 
Study of Delinquency Prevention, by Bruce B. Robinson; and Con- 
flict Versus Cooperation between the Classroom Teacher and the 
Clinician, by Harold H. Abelson, 

Dobbs, Harrison Allen: "The Classroom Teacher and Delinquency Pre- 
'•■ ■ vention." ELEIvIENTARY SCHOOL JOURI^IAL,' Vol. 50, Maro 1,950. pp. 376-383, 
Shows -hovif teaohers can aid in preventing and controlling juve- 
nile delinquency.' "'-■.■ 

Griffiths, William: BEHAVIOR DIFFICULTIES OF CHILDREN AS PERCEIVED 

AND JUDGED BY PARENTS, -.TEACHERS i AND CHILDREN THEl.IS ELVES. University 
of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, 1952. 116 pp., 

A study made to learn the kinds of behavior problems children 
think they have in comparison with those their parents, and teachers 
think they havea 



-21- 

Joint Advisory Committee On The Harlem Project, Research Committee: 
THE ROLE. OF THE SCHOOL IN PREVRmTING AITO CORRECTING .'IALADJUSTMEImT 
AND DELINQUEJJCY. The Committee, Nevj York, 1949. 154 pp. 

A report of the "Karlera Project," This project, sponsored 
jointly by the New York Foundation and. the Board of. Education of 
the City of New York, was conducted in three schools in 1943-45. 

Kahn, Alfred J,: "Who Are Our Truants?" FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 15, 
Mar. 1951, pp. 35-40. 

An analysis of the problem of truancy with special emphasis on 
the disturbed, unlawful absentee with behavior problems. Points out 
that in many jurisdictions habitual truancy .is considered juvenile 
• delinquency as defined by law, , . 

Kvaraceus, William C.J , JUVENILE DELIiMQUENCY AND THE SCHOOL. Wo-rld 
Book Company, Yonkers-on-Hudson, New York,, 1945. 337 pp. 

Describes 'the work of the passaip Children's Bureau in integrating 
community action in order to bring about the prevention and control 
of juvenile delinquency. 

Laycock, S. R.: "The School's Part in Preventing Juvenile Delinquency." 
* SCHOOL (elementary edition) Vol. 34, Mar. 1946, pp. 547-552. 

Outlines the characteristics a school should have in order to 
be able to combat juvenile delinquency. 

. - . 
Mullen, Frances A.: "Truancy and Classroom Disorder as Symptoms of 

Personality Problems." JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol. 41, 
Feb. 1950, pp. 97-109, 

The data for this study were compiled from records of the • 
Bureau of Child Study of the Chicago Board of Education, 

National 'Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON SCHOOL AND TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY, U. S. Gov't Print, 
Off., Washington,, 1947, 35 pp. . ._ 

National Society for the Study of Education: FORTY-SEVENTH YEARBOOK. 
PART I - JUVEivTILE DELINQUENCY AND THE SCHOOLS, Kelson B. Henry, ■ 
ed. Universitj' of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1948. 280 pp. 

Includes: VvTiat Makes a Child Delinquerit? by lilliam, Healy and 
Augusta F, Bronner;' Prevention of Delinquency Through Guided Group 
Experience, by Ruth Strang; How Community Agencies May Help With 
Problems of Delinquency, by Howard Y. McClusk;^'-; Special Community 
Programs to Prevent Delinquency, by I.Iiriam Van Waters; Hov/ School 
Services Help to Prevent Delinquency, by Bess Goodykoontz; The Role 
of the Administrator in Relation to Juvenile Delinquency, b/ William 
C, Kvaraceus; and Special Schools for Emotionally Disturbed Children, 
by Bruno Bettelheim, 



- 22- 

New York State Youth Commission: REDUCING JUVEl>iILE DELIIIQUEIJCY: WHAT 

NEfif YORK STATE SCHOOLS CAN DO. The Coimnission, Albany, 1952. 34 pp. 

A study made by the Commission in order to determine additional 
ways in which the school can help prevent juvenile delinquency. 

Powers, Sdm nt "The School's Responsibility for the Early Detection 

of Delinquency-Prone Children," HARVARD, EDUCATION REVIEW, Vol. 19, 
Spring 1949. pp. 80-86. 

Describes a research project attempting to select delinquency- 
prone children. 

Seymour, H. C: "Rochester's Co-ordinated School Services for Delin- 
quency Prevention." JOUHIIAL OF EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY, Vol. 24, 
.Sept, 1950. pp, 30-35. 

Smith, Philip- M-: "The Schools and Juvenile Delinquency." SOCIOLOGY 
AND SOCIAL RESEARCH, Vol. 37, Nov. -Dec. 1952. pp. 85-91. 

Discusses (1) the school as a factor in delinquency causation; 
(2) the school as an agency in delinquency prevention; and (3) 
special problems of school programs of delinquency control, 

Ullmann', Charles A.: IDEImTIFICATION OF MALADJUSTED SCHOOL CHILDREN: 
COi.lPARISON OF THREE IffiTHODS OF SCREEtJING. (public Health Mono- 
graph No. 7.) U. S. Gov't Print, Off., Washington, 1952, 41 pp. 

Surveys the nature and extent of the mental health problem 
among a group of ninth grade children in "the Prince Georges County 
Schools and attempts to develop a method of identifj'-ing those 
children who need psychological assistance. 

/u. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare/, Office of Education: 
~ JUVEI\IILE DELINQUENCY AI\iD THE SCHOOLS IN YiTARTirJE. (School Children 

and, the War Series Leaflet No. 8) U. S. Gov't Printo Off., 

Washington, 1943. 26 pp. 

Examines the causes oJf juvenile delinquency during wartime, cites 

some typical situations and considers what the schools are doing 

to meet the problem of juvenile delinquency, 

Volz, Horace S.: "The Role of the School in the Prevention and Treat- 
ment of Delinquent and Other Abnormal Behavior," SCHOOL AND 
SOCIETY, Vol. 71, Jan, 14, 1950, pp. 21-22,, 



TREATIvIENT 



General 



Abbott i. Grace: THE CHILD AND THE STATE, Vol. II - THE DEPENDENT AND 
THE DELINQUENT CHILD, THE CHILD OF Ul^iAREIED PARENTS, University 
of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1933, 701 pp. 

Presents selected documents on the treatment of child offenders 
in England and the United Sfates, pp. 323-489, 

Barnes, Harry Elmer, and Teeters, Negley K, : I'ilEW HORIZONS IN 

CRIMINOLOGY. (2d ed,) Prentice-Hall, Inc, New York. 1951, 887 pp. 

Includes chapters on the psychiatric approach to delinquency 
and crime, children's courts and child guidance clinics, disposition 
of children's cases, and Youth and Adult Authorities, 

Bettelheim, Bruno: "On The Rehabilitation of Offenders," FEDERAL 
PROBATION, Vol. 13, Dec, 1949, pp, 5-15, 

Argues that punishment has very little or no corrective value 
and that the real emphasis should be placed on the rehabilitation 
of the ■offender. 

Children's Bureau, U. 3. Department of Health, Education, and T/elfare: 
HELPING DELRTQUENT CHILDREN (C.B. Pub. No. 341) U. S. Gov't Print. 
Off.,' i/ashington, 1953. 47 pp. 

An explanation and description of i/h at services for delinquent 
Children should be like, if they are to be effective in helping 
these children toward rehabilitation. 

Children's Bureau, U, S. Department of Health, Education, and tj'elfare: 
REGOl'&IENDED STAl-^DARDS FOR SERVICES FOR DELINQUHvTT CHILDREN. The 
Bureau, Tifashington, 1953. 21 pp. Processed. 

A docviment intended for the use of professional workers and 
experts in the delinquency field that brings together standards of 
organization and practice for certain agencies and institutions 
that serve delinquent children. The statements were tsiken from 
the publications of numerous national organizations. 

Children's Bureau, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: 
WHAT'S HAPPEl^'ING TO DELINQUENT CHILDREN W YOUR TOUN? (C.B. Pub. 
No, 342) U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 1953. 26 pp. 

A guide made up of series of questions that will help citizen 
groups secure the facts about existing services for delinquent 
children in their own communities and States, 

-23- 



. 2k . 

Eissler, K. R.: "Ego-psychological Implications of the Fsychoanalytic 
Treatanent of Delinauents." THE PSYCHOMAI.YTIC STUDY OF THE CHH^D, 
Vol. V. International Universities Press, Inc., New York, 1950. 
pp. 97-121. 

The author presents three points which he considers indlspensatle 
in the treatment of delinquents. 

Eissler, K. R. editor. SEARCHLIGHTS ON DELINQUENCY: NEW PSYCHOANALYTIC 
STUDIES. International Universities Press, Inc., New York, 19^9. 
k^6 pp, 

A survey -of progress in the trea tnent of delinq.uency . Includes 
• 3^ papers grouped under the following headings: General Problems} 
Clinical Prohlems; Technique and Therapy; Etiology and Development; 
Social Psychology; Penology; and Surveys. 

Friedlander, Kate: THE PSYCHO -ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO JUVENILE DELIN- 
QUENCY --THEORY: CASE-STUDIiS: TREATMENT.' International Uni- 
-versltles Press,, -Inc., New York, 19^7. 296 pp. . 

Considers which prohlems of Juvenile delinquency can he solved 
"by psychoanalytical theory and practice' and what contribution psy- 
choanalysis can make to the various fields of criminal research. 

Gluckman, iRobert M: "The Role of Psychiatry in the Understanding and 
Treatment of Juvenile Delinquency." FEIfflRAL PROBATION, Vol. 15, 
Sept. 195U pp. 25-30. 

Defines the treatment function of the psychiatrist, the types of 
resident psychiatric treatment, and the role of the psychiatrist in 
the community. 

Hoyleis, J.- Arthur: THE TEEftTMENT OF THE YOUNG DELINQUENT. Philosophical 
Library, New York, 1952. 273 pp. - . ■ 

Surveys the changes in the reaction of ^he ccanmunity to Juvenile 
delinquency during the past century and describes the new techniques 
for handling Juvenile delihuents which have been developed through 
research and experiments. 

Jenkins, R. L,: "The Psychopathic Delinquent." SOCIAL WORK IN THE 

CURRENT SCENE, SELECTED PAPERS, 76th ANNUAL MEETING,- NATIONAL CON- 
■■ FERENCE OF SOCIAL WORK, 191^9. Columbia Unirerslty Press, New York, 
1950. pp. 290-301. 

Describes various traits of emotionally disturbed delinquents 
and suggests ways of treating them. 

Llppman, H. S.: "Use of Case Work in the Treatment of Delinquency." 

SMITH -COLLEGE STUDIES IN SOCIAL WORK, Vol. ik, Sept. 19i^3. PP. 173-183. 

McNlcKLe, Rotna K.:' "Teen-Age Lawbreakers." EDITORIAL RESEARCH REPORTS, 
Vol. 2, Sept. 8, 1950. Entire issue. 

Considers the treatment of Juvenile delinquents both In courts 
and in institutions. 



- 25 - 

Midcentury White House Conference for Children and Youth: A HFALTHY 

PEHSOKALITY FOR EVERY CHILD: A DIGSSt' Of' THE FACT FINDING REPORT 
TO THE MIDCENTURY VffllTE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON- CHILDREN AND YOUTH. 
.Health Publications Institute, Inc., Raleigh, N.C., 1951, 197 pp. 
"Juvenile Courts and Services, for Delinquents." pp. 151-157, 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
ftEl'0e5r>;D».:CASE -WaRK-GROUP-WOEK -" - <© pp. 

iftEPOKT-oir iffiirEfti.^iffiM.iff^Airo'iCHiiJ.iGiriBANCfi'JCiiiirieBs" 14 pp, 

U. 3. Gov't Print. Off., ?/ashington, 1947, 

National Probation Association: SOCIAL DEFENSES AGAKST CRIME. YEARBOOK, 
1942, i^ferjo^-ie Bsll,. Ed. The Association, New York, 1942. 346 pp. 

Includes: Comnunity Organization and Crime Prevention, by Edward 
Haydon; The Co.urt as a Case, ^fork Agency, by Peter Geiserj Public 
Child 7elfare Services and the Courts, by Margaret A, Emery; Social 
Case Work in Probation and Parole, by Gladys E. Hall; Juvenile De- 
tention: Ten Years* Use of Boarding Homes, by Henry Lenz; and 
Differential Levels in the Institutional Treatment of the Juvenile 
Delinquent, by Abraham L. Simon and Dorothy D\inaeff . 

National Probation Association: TRENDS IN CRII^E TREATMENT. YEARBOOK, 
1939, lilarjarie Bell, ed. The Association, New York, 1939 , 372 pp. 
Includes: The Role of the School in Crime Prevent'ion, by Helen 
E. Weston; Understanding tihe Delinquent, by Lottie Bialosky; De- 
veloping Attitudes Through Supervision,, by L, P/allace Hoffman; The 
Use of Bqarding Homes for Detention, by Marjorie Yi'allace Lenz; 
The Future of xhe Juvenile Court as a Case "York Agency, by Alice 
Scott Nutt; and the Child in Detention as Seen by the Psychiatrist, 
by John Chornyak, 

Peck, Harris .B,: '.'Resistance in Delinquency/' SOCIAL WORK IN THE 

CURRENT SCE1:E, 1950; SELECTED PAPERS, 77th ANNUAL MEETING, NATIONAL 
CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL llOiiK, Columbia University Press, Hen York, 
. 1950, pp. 378-384, 

Urges drastic revision of many of the present ways of approaching 
delinquents and their families and recommends the provision of commun- 
1 ity services to meet the needs of the delinquents,' 

Reckless, ¥/alter C.: "Significant Trends in the Treatment of Crime and 
Delinquency." FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 13, Mar. 1949, pp, 6-11 

Tells about improved methods which are developing in the correc- 
tional field, 

Redl, Fritz: and ./iner.ian, David: CONTROLS FROM ;IITHIN: TECHNIQUES FOR 

THE TREAI!iffiNT OF THE AGGRESSIVE CHILD. The Free Press, Glencoe, 111., 
1952. 232 pp. 

Proposes techniques for the rehabilitation of the aggressive 
child and points out that information gained from working -vi th these 
disturbed children may be used in helping normal children develop 
adequate self-control. 



- 26 - - 

Slavson, S.R.: CHILD PSYCHOTHERAPY. Columbia University Press, New 
York, 1952. 332 pp. 

Designed primarily as a clinical study with special emphasis 
on the treatment process of the emotionally disturbed and socially 
maladjusted . child, 

Slavson, S. R.: "Hilieu and Group Treatment for Delinquents," PRO- 

CEEDBIGS OF THE NATIONAL COl^ERENCE OF SOCIAL T/ORK, 1943, Columbia 
University Press, New York, 1949, pp, 372-380. 

. Outlines some of the basic considerations in the psychodynamics 
of delinquency emd- considers the environmental setting and the use 
of group therapy in the treatment of delinquents, 

"Symposium on Young Offenders." NEBRASKA LAW REVIEW, Vol, 29, Lincoln, 
May 1950, pp. 521-604, 

Includes: Rationale of Responsibility for Young Offenders, by 
Frederick J, Ludwig; Unofficial Delinquency, by Paul W, Tappan; 
Probation Techniques, by Irving TJ, Halpern; and Institutional Treat- 
ment of Juvenile Delinquents, by Negley H, Teeters, 



Clinics 



Bender, Lauretta: CHILD PSYCHIATRIC TSCHInIIQUES : DIAGNOSTIC AND THERA- 
PEUTIC APPROACH TO N0RI'.1AL AND ABNORI>i[AL DEVELOPLffiNT THROUGH PATTERNED, 
EXPRESSIVE Al^ID GROUP BEHAVIOR. Charles C. Thomas, Publisher, 
Springfield, 111. 1952, 360 pp, 

A collection of papers dealing -rath the care, treatment and ob- 
servation of children with problems, in the Children's PiTard of the 
Psychiatric Division of Bellevue Hospital, Includes a bibliography, 

Bronner, Augusta F,: "Treatment and liiThat Happened Afterward,'-' AlERICAN 
JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Vol. 14, Jan, 1944. pp. 23-35, 

A follow-up study of 250 cases at the Judge Baker Guidance 
Center was made in order to check the unexpectedly favorable find- 
ings in a study of 400 cases which was published in 1939, 

Davidoff, Eugene j and Noetzel, Elinor S.: THE CHILD GUIDANCE APPROACH 
TO JUVENILE DELINQU'ENCY. Chil'd Care Publications, New York, 1951, 
173 pp, 

A study based on experimental work carried on at the Syracuse 
Psychopathic Outpatient Department and Hospital during the years 
1936-42, Recommends ways of dealing with juvenile delinquency and 
^outlines, a program for helping and guiding delinquent children* 



- 27 - 

Doshay, Lewis Jacob: THE BOY SEX OFFENDER AND HIS LATER CAREER. Grune 
& Stratton, New York^ 1943. 206 pp. 

A folloW.-up "study of 256 male sex offenders, of normal intelli- 
gence, treated at New York Children's Court clinics. The study 
covers family background, personality, and adult career. 

Gardner, George B. : "'Psychiatric Referrals for Delinquent Children." 
PUBLIC HEALTH, REPORTS., Vol. 68, No. 6, June, 1953, pp. 578-582 

The director b'f the Judge Baker Guidance Center in Boston 
describes' treatment, discusses the varying psychiatric needs of 
delinquent children. 

Glueok, Sheldon, and Glueck, Eleanor: JUVEl^IILE DELINQUENTS GROWN UP. 
The Commonwealth Fund, New York, 1940. 330 pp. 

A sequel to ONE .THOUSAND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS (See -below.) Con- 
tinues the study of the careers of ,1,000 delinquents for a ten- 
year period after a previous five-year investigation as described 
in the earlier study. 

Glueok, Sheldon, and Glueck, Eleanor: ONE THOUSAND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS: 
THEIR TREATlvIENT BY COURT AND CLINIC. Harvard University Press, 
Cambridge, 1934, 341 pp. 

A study of the behavior of 1,000 delinquent boys during the 
first five-year period after completion of a period of treatment by 
the Boston Juvenile Court and the Judge Baker Foundation, Analyzes 
the effectiveness of both the court and the child guidance clinic 
and describes the. procedures of these institutions, <■ 

Healy, William, 'and "Bronner, Augusta F,: NEIV LIGHTS ON DELINQUENCY AND 
ITS TREAB'lENT. RESULTS OF A RESEARCH CONDUCTED FOR THE INSTITUTE OF 
HUIvIAN RELATIONS, YALE UNIVERSITY. Yale University Press, New 
Haven, 1936. 226 pp. .. ' 

A research study of the causes and prevention of juvenile de- 
• linqu'ency which' was carried on in Boston, New Haven, and Detroit. 
In this study the family, rather than the delinquent child, was 
taken as the unit of research. .. 

Healy, William, and Broroier, Augusta F.: , TREATIiffiNT Al^D 7/HAT HAPPENED 
AFTERWARD. Judge Baker Guidance Center, Boston, 1939. 54 pp, 
A study of the later adjustments of 400 cases treated from 
five to eight years previously at the Judge Baker Guidance Center. 

Rogers, Carl: THE CLINICAL TREATMENT OF THE PROBLEM CHILD, Houghton 
Mifflin Co., Boston, 1939. 393 pp. 

Describes and discusses the various treatment skills actually 
used in clinical work. Includes a bibliography at the end of each 
chapter. ' 



. - 28 - . 

Rosenthal, Pauline: "Group Studies of Pre-Adolescent Delinquent Boys." 
AIVIERICM JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Vol. 12, Jan, 1942. pp. 115-126, 

A report dealing with a group technique evolved in the Children's 
Ward of the Bellevue Hospital Psychiatric Department. This tech- 
nique was ■ developed in order, to study, group behavior of pre-ado- 
lescent delinquents under confinement. 

Thorn, Douglas A.» and Johnston, Florence S.:, ".Time as a Factor in the 
Solution of Delinquency." MENTAL HYGIENE, Vol, 25, Apr. 1941. 
pp. 269-287. 

A study of -a group of children at the child-guidance clinics 
operated under the Division of Mental Hygiene of the State of 
Massachusetts. 

Witmer, Helen Leland: PSYCHIATRIC CLINICS FOR CHILDREN. The Common- 
wealth Fund, New York, 1940, 414 pp. 

Reviews the theoretical and historical background of psychiatric 
clinics for children, surveys the state-financed clinics, and 
suggests principles for future programs. 



Courts 



Beckham, Yjalter H.: "Helpful Practices in Juvenile 'Court Hearings." 
FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 13, June 1949. pp. 10-14. 

A juvenile court judge discusses helpful techniques in dealing 
with delinquent children. 

Brill, Jeanette G., and Payne, E. George: THE ADOLESCENT COURT AND 

CRIME PREVENTION. Pitman Publishing Corp., New York, 1938, 230 pp. 
Discusses the essential facts relating to adolescence, indicates 
the place of the adolescent court in the treatment of youthful 
offenders, and sug-gests ways of solving the problem of d&linquency. 

Children's Bureau, /u, S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare/: 
THE COURT AND Tlffi CHILDREN'S AGENCY: ''jORKING TOGETHER FOR CHILDREN. 
The Bureau, Washington, 1949, 17 pp. Processed, 

Contains: Children' s 'Courts, an Effective Aid to Social Agencies 
by Victor B, ^*ylegala; Social Work and the Court in the Protection 
of Children, by Alan Keith-Lucas; and Social Work and the Court, 
by Mazie F, Rappaport. 

Children's Bureau, /u. S. Department of Health, Education, and We If are/ s 
JUVENILE COURT LAWS IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES. Prepared by Anna Kalet 
Smith. (C.B. Pub. No, 328) U, S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 
1949, 67 pp. 



- 29 - 

Frankel, Emilj' "The Offender and the Court: A Statistical Analysis of 
the Sentencing of Delinquents." JOURNAL OF CREnNAL LAW AND 
CRIMINOLOGY, Vol, 31, Nov.-Dec. 1940. pp. 448-456. 

An emalysis of the sentences passed by four New Jersey judges 
during three selected years. 

Gardner, George E. : "The Juvenile Court as a Child Care Institution." 
FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 16, June 1952, pp. 8-12, 

The director of the Judge Baker Guidance Center at Boston traces 
the developments that have taken place in the field of child care, 
and emphasizes the urgent need for more exact knowledge concerning 
child' development in general and the child's delinquent or abnormal 
■ act in particular; . . . • , 

Goldberg, Harriet L.: CHILD OFFENDERS. Grune & Stratton, New York, 
1948. 215 pp. 

A study in diagnosis and treatment in which ^the author records a 
large number of case studies and gives samples of day-to-day problems 
arising in a juvenile court. Recommends community planning and con- 
• .-.. certed action to help meet the problem of juvenile delinquency, 

Harrison, Leonard V,: CHAOS IN SEIITENCING YOUTH OFFEDIDERS. The Committee 
on Youth and Justice, Community Service Society of New York, New 
York, July 1945, 52 pp. . 

A study based, on the records of one hundred delinquent youths 
vho were arraigned in the New York City courts. 

Harrison, Leonard Vi arid Grant, Pryor M.: YOUTH IN THETOILS^ 
Macmillan' Co., New .York, 1938. 168 pp., 

A study of the ; problems of youthful offenders in New York City, 
Considers methods of treating youthful offenders and gives concrete 
illustrations. 

In-fcernational Committee of the Howard League for Penal Reform: LAWLESS 
■, .YOUTH: A CHALLENGE , TO- THE NEliT EUROPE. George Allen & Unwl n 
Ltd., London, 1947. 252 pp. 

Includes critical surrimaries of the law and practice of various 
• eoion tries relating to. the treatment of juvenile delinquents. 

Larson, John Farr: "Utah's State-Wide Juvenile Court Plan." FEDERAL 
.PROBATION, Vol. 13, June 1949.. pp. 15-19, 

Considers some of the problems faced in the developijient of 
juvenile court services in Utah, the first state to adopt a state- 
wide juvenile court plan. 

Levy, Ruth Jacobs: REDUCTIONS IN RECIDIVISM THROUGH THERAPY. Thomas 
Seltzer, New York, 1941. 143 pp. 

An experiment with 100 boys between the ages of 10 and 12, who had 
been arraigned for delinquency in the Manhattan Children's Court, 



- 30 - 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON JUVENILE COURT ADMINISTRATION. 23 pp. 
REPORT ON JUVENILE COURT LAWS. 20 pp. 
U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 194?. 

National Probation and Parole Association: CUE^RENT APPROACHES TO DE- 
LINQUENCY, YEARBOOK, 19^9. Marjorie Bell, ed. The Association, 
New York, 1950. 319 PP. 

Includes: Fifty Years of the Juvenile Court, hy Charles L. Chute; 
The Court Hearing as a Part of the Treatment Process, by (Justav L. 
Schramm; The Psychopathic Adolescent Offender, by Ralph S . Banay; 
The Girl Runaway, by Mary Huff Diggs; The Junior Probation Camps 
of Los Angeles County, by John M. Zuck; a Detention Home Activities 
Program, by Richard Allaman; Personality, Crime, and the Cultural 
Pattern, by Austin L. Porterfield; Social Change and the Delinquent 
Personality, by Herbert A. Bloch; and the United Nations in the Field 
of Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders, by Adolphe 
Dolierneux. 

Nutt, Alice Scotti "The Juvenile Court in Relation to the Community -- 
An Evaluation" SOCIAL SERVICE REVIEW, Vol. 1?, Mar. 19i^3, pp. 1-?. 

Nutt, Alice Scott: "The Juvenile Court and the Public Welfare Agency 
in the Child Welfare Program." CHILD 'WELFARE AT THE CROSSROADS. 
(C.B. Pub. No. 32?) U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 19^9. 
pp. 20-30. 

Among the topics discussed are: the concept underlying child 
welfare services, basic principles of Juvenile court law, the court 
and administrative responsibilities, public provisions for child 
welfare, and new aligimients for the' f liture , 

Phillips, Orie L.: "The Federal Youth Corrections Act." FEDERAL 
PROBATION, Vol. 15, Mar. 1951. pp. 3-11. 

Summaritee the high lights of the Act, approved September, 1950, 
which provides a system for the treatment and rehabilitation of youth 
offenders. . 

Poller, Justine W.: EVERYONE'S CHILDREN, NOBODY'S CHILD. Charles 
- Scrlbner's Sons, New York, I9I+I. 331 pp. 

A Judge of the New York City Children's Court analyzes the causes 
and -effects of Juvenile delinquency and urges greater Individual and 
communal responsibility for child welfare. 

Reinemann, John Otto: "Fifty Years of the Juvenile Court Movement in the 
United States." MENTAL HYGIENE, Vol. 3^, July 1950. pp. 39I-399. 

Evaluates the Juvenile -court movement during the first half -cen- 
tury and considers its most significant effects. 



- 31 - 

Zanders, Wiley Brittont JTJVEl^IILE COURTS IN NORTH CAROLINA* University 
of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill* 1948. 210 pp» 

Analyzes all of the childi'en' s cases officially handled by the 
juvenile coiirts in North Carolina over a ten-year period, 1934-1944> 
and describes, in detail the -orgeinization and procedure of the 107 
juvenile courts within the state. 

Smyth, George Y:,i "The Juvenile Court and Delinquent Parents." FEDERAL 
PROBATION, Vol. 13, March 1949. pp. 12-17, 

Judge Smyth points out that the problems of the parents and 
children are inseparable and that the juvenile court should be an 
institute of family relations with the force of law behind it, 

"Special Issue Comraemor-ating the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Juvenile 
Coui;t," FEDERAL PROBATION, Vol. 13, Sept, 1949. pp. 1-68. 

Includes: The Juvenile Court today, by Katherine F, Lenroot; 
In Defense of Juvenile Courts, by Harrison A. Dobbs; The Expansion 
of the Juvenile Court Idea, by John 0. Reinemann; Keeping Children 
Out of Jails; It Can Be Done, by Austin H. LlacCormick and Jsimes H, 
Dooling; Foster Homes for Juvenile Delinquents, by Herbert D. 
Williams; The Potential Role of the School Counselor .in Delinquency 
Prevention and Treatment, by Robert C. Taber; Understanding Juve- 
nile Delinquency, -by Edith K. Lesser; and The Meaning of Juvenile 
Delinquency Statistics, by I. Richard Perlman. 

Sussman, Frederick B.: LAW OF JUVEI'IILE DELINQUENCY: THE LAVifS OF THE 
FORTY-EIGHT STATES. (Legal Almanac Series No. 22.) Oceana 
Publication, New York, 1950. 96 pp. 

Tappan, Paul V;,: DELINQUENT GIRLS IN COURT: A STUDY OF THE WAYWARD 
MINOR COURT OF NEW YORK. Columbia University Press, New York 
1947. 265 pp. 

Examines the purpose, procedure, and action of the court in 
th? light of social welfare, 

Wollan, Kenneth I.; "A New Treatment Program for Juvenile Delinquents." 
JOURNAL OF CRBilNAL LAW AND CRBIINOLOGY, Vol. 31, Mar. -Apr, 1941. 
pp. .712-719, 

Discusses the treatment methods used by the Citizenship Train- 
ing Department of the Boston Juvenile Court. 



Detention 



Beck, Bertram M., and Harrison, Leonard V.: WHILE CHILDREN WAIT: RE- 
PORT ON TEMPORARY DETENTION OF DELINQUENT AND ALLEGEDLY DELINQUENT 
CHILDREN, Community Service Society, New York, 1949, 56 pp. 



Close^ Kathryns "j^iil is No Place -for a Child," SURVEY,; Vol, 86, 
Mar. 1950, pp.. 138-143. 

Discusses what is being done in North Carolina to tosep- children 

out of jail,/ V : X~-.^- 

National ,Conf eroQce o«' Prevoniion-and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON JUVENILE DETiMTION,- U. S. Gov't Print, Off., Washington, 
1947, 25 pp, . , ' . ' 

•National Probation .and Parole Association, THE QE^ENTION OF CHILDREN 
IN ILLINOIS, The AsBociation, Chicago, 1952. '03 pp. Processed. 

This study was undertaken "(1) to ascertain the nature and extent 
of the problem of juvenile. detention ih Illinois and (2) to determine 
■whether there existed a sound basis for a demonstration project vhich 
would help communities with the problem of juvenile detention.** 

Norman, Sherwood: THE DETENTION OF CHILDREN IN MICHIGAN: A STUDY RE- 
QUESTED BY THE MICHIGAN PROBATE JUDGES ASSOCIATION.' National Pro- 
bation and Parole Association, New York, 1952. 79 pp. 

Nonnan, Sherwood, and Normal, Helen: DETENTION FOR THE JUVENILE COURT: 
A DISCUSSION OF PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 2d ed.) National Pro- 
bation Association, New York, 1946. 48 pp. Processed. 

A study of 68 detention facilities in 22 states undertaken to 
determine the best in all types of detention care throughout the 
United -States, • 

Tolraan, Ruth S., and TTales, Ralph G.: JUVENILE DETECTION IN CALIFORNIA: 
CURRENT PRACTICES AND RECOIIM®IDED PRINCIPLES. California Advisory 
Committee on Detention Home Problems, Los Angeles, 1946. 92 pp. 



Institutions 



Aichhom, August: DA YWARD YOUTH, VUcing Press, New York," 1938, 236 pp, 
' The author discusses the application pf psychoanalysis to the 
treatment of delinquent youth and illustrates with examples from his 
own experience. Points out that the treatment of the delinquent is 
pirimarily a matter of reeducation. Considers in detail the causes 
of delinquency, 

Argow, /alter Webster: "The Function of a Research Department in an 

Institution for Delinquents." JOUR^TAL OF CREvIINAL LAY^ AND CRBAINOL- 
OGY, Vol, 31, Sept, -Oct. 1940, pp. 280-290. 

Surveys the trends of research in correctional schools and out- 
lines problems that may be studied, 

Ash, Philip: "The Discrepancy Between Reported Schooling and Tested 

Scholastic Ability among Adolescent Delinquents." JOURNAL OF APPLIED 



, - 33 - 

PSYCHOLOSY, Vpl. 31,. June 19^7. PP. 323-328. 

A study of a group of 85 Juvenile delinq.uentB af N*w York Clty'fl 
Reformatory for Boys . 

Beck, Bertram M.: YOUTH WITHIN WALLS. Community Service Society of New 
York, New York, 1950. 70' pp. 

"A study of the correctional treatment of the I6 tf* 21 year old 
male offender in New York State institutions with recommendations 
for future development." 

Berg, Renee: "A New Progreim for Boys and girls Reutming Home from 
Training ScHool." PUBLIC WELFARE, Vol. 9, June 1951. PP. 133-136. 
Pescri'bes Maryland's new program, 

Bettelhelm, Bruno: LOVE IS NOT. ENOUGH:" THE TREATMENT OF EMOTIONALLY 
DISTURBED CHILDREN. The Free Press, Glsncoe, 111., 1950. 386 pp. 
A report of the day-to-day li'fe at an institution for the care 
and treatment of emotionally disturbed children. 

Black, Bertram J., and Glick, Selmo J.: RECIDIVISM AT THE HAWTHORNE -CEDAR 
KNOLLS SCHOOL: PREDICTED VS. ACTUAL OUTCOME FOR DELINQUENT BOYS. (Re- 
search Monograph No. 2.) Jewish Board of Guardians, New York, ko pp. 

A study of the rate of recidivism einong delinquent boys at the 
Hawthorne -Cedar Knolls School. 

Bowler, Alida C, and Bloodgood, Ruth S.: INSTITUTIONAL TREATMENT OF DE- 
LINQUENT BOYS: PART I. - TREATMENT PROGRAMS OF FIVE STATE INSTITUTIONS, 
(C.B. Pub. No. 228) U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 1935. 32k pp. 

This section of the study deals particularly witH the plants and 
programs of these institutions. 

Bowler, Alida C, and Bloodgood, Ruth S.: INSTITUTIONAL TREATMENT OF 
DELINQUENT BOYS: PART II - A STUDY OF 751 BOYS. (C.B. Pub. No. 230) 
U. S. Gov't Print.. Off., Washington, 1936, lJf9 pp. 

Presents an analysis of the reaults of institutional treatment based 
on a study of 751 boys who had been in 5 State institutions and had 
been released 5 or more years prior to the time of the study. 

.Children's Bureau, U, S, Department of Health, Educatio?*, and Welfare: 
RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT CENTERS. . . FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILD- 
REN: A LISTING. U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 1953. 78 pp. 

Describes the services, staffs and facilities of 36. centers whose 
primary purpose la the treatment of emotional and personality 
problems of children. 

Children's Bureau, ^. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare?: 
PUBLIC TRAININ* SCHOOLS FOR DELINQUENT CHILDREN (C.B, Pub. No. 265) 
The Bureau, Washington, Nov. 19^9, k2 pp, Processed. 



- 34 - 

Clendenen, Richard: AFTER THE TRAINING SCHOOL -WHAT? U. S. Social 

Security Administration, Children's Bureau, Washington, 1950, 9 pp» 
Processed, 

Discusses plans for providing aftercare services for children 
when they leave training schools, 

Cohen, Frank J,: CHILDREN IN TROUBLE: AN EXPERDffiNT IN HSTITUTIONAL 
CHILD CARE, W, W. Norton & Co., New York, 1952, 251 pp. 

The director of Youth House, New York City's detention home for 
the temporary care of delinquent children, shows how these children 
can be directed toward healthy normal growth, 

Deutsch, Albert: OUR REJECTED CHILDREN, Little, Brown and Company, 
Boston, 1950, 292 pp. 

Describes the conditions of child delinquents in some public 
and private institutions, traces their community background, and 
considers the available facts and theories on the cause, cure, 
and prevention of juvenile delinquency, 

Gersten, Charles: "Group Therapy with Institutionalized Juvenile De- 
linquents." PEDAGOGICAL SEI'IINARY AND JOURNAL OF GENETIC PSYCHOLOGY, 
Vol, 80, Mar, 1952, pp. 35-64, 

Examines amd evaluates chsuiges in behavior and in. intellectual, 
emotional, and social adjustment in a group of boys who participated 
in group therapy over a period of 20 weeks, 

Gittins, John: APPROVED SCHOOL BOYS. H, M, Stationery Office, London, 
1952, 126 pp. 

Presents observations and experiences of a group of workers deal- 
ing with delinquent boys who have been committed — usually by 
juvenile courts — for training in Aycliffe School, 

Glueck, Sheldon, and Glueck, Eleanor: CRIMINAL CAREERS IN RETROSPECT. 
The Commonwealth Fund, New York, 1943, 330 pp. 

The third in a series of follow-up studies of the careers of 510 
offenders who had been inmates of the Massachusetts Reformatory, 

Habbe, Stephen: "Treatment Programs in American Training Schools for 
Delinquents," JOURl\iAL OF CONSULTING PSYCHOLOGY, Vol, 7, May-June 
1943, pp, 142-159, 

Includes information on physical setup^ specialized personnel, 
program^ treatment, and philosophy of institutional care, 

Healy, William^, and Alper, Benedict S.: CRIIINAL YOUTH AND THE BORSTAL 
SYSTEM, The Commonwelath Fund, New York, 1941, 251 pp. . , 

Considers the origin, development, and administration of the 
British Borstal system and evaluates its effectiveness in the train- 
ing and treatment of juvenile delinquency. 



- 35 - 

Ingram, Chrlstiae P.: in collatoration with Elise B. Martens, and 

■ Katherlne M. Cook: EDUCATION IN TRAINING SCHOOI^ FOR. DELINQUENT 
■■■' YOUTH. (U. S. Office of Education, Bulletin No. 5, 19^5-) U. S. 
Gov't Print. Off.,: Washington, 19l<^5. 93 pp. 

Discuasea the fundamental principles and objectives of edu- 
"• catioiial prdgr^ims in. the training schools and presents a study- 
guide for teachers in training schools, ,. 

Konppka, Gisela: THERAPEUTIC RGROUP WORK WITH CHILDREN. University of 
■ Minnesota JPresS, Minneapolis, 19^9. 13^ pp. 

A description of group workvlth emotionally disturbed and delin- 
quent children at the Mirinesota State Training School for Bo7S> 
and the Pittsburgh Child Guidance Clinic. 

■Erause, Lawrence J.: THE CORRELATION OF ADJUSTMENT AND, ACHIEVEMENT IN 
DELINQUENT BOYS. (Studies in Psychology aand Psychiatry, Catholic 
University of America, Vol. 5 No. 2) Catholic University of America 
Press, Washington, 19'i-l. 1^ pp. 

A comparative study of adjustment and achievement characteristics 
of one hundred boys in an inatitution for delinquents and a control 
group of an equal number in a private day school. 

Leonard, Charles W.:. "The Relationship of the Correctional Institution 
to Commuiiity Agencies." . SOCIAL WORK IN THE CURRENT SCENE, 1950: 
• SEI2CTED PAPERS, 77th ANNUAL MEETING, NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL 
WORK, Columbia University Press, New York, 1950. pp. 6I-69. 

Urges community organizations to emphasize the rehabilitation 
and treatment facllitlea rather than the punishment aspects of the 
correctional Institution. 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
■ REPORT ON INSTITUTIONAL TflEATMENT OF DELINQUENT JUVENILES. U. S. 
Gov't Pflnti Off.,. Washington, 19^7. 55 pp. 

Obers, Samuel J., Goldman, Julia, and Suseman, Sarah: "Fellowship House; 
A Small -Group Residence for Adolescent Boys." MENTAL HYGIENE, 
•Vol. 37, Jan. 1953, pp. 66-75. 

This study carried on over a two-year period by the Jewish Child 
Ow.o Association of New York, describes the experience with a emall- 
• group residence for maladjusted adolescent boys. 

Perlman, I. Richard, and Wiener, Jack: CHILDREN LIVING , IN SELECTED 
PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, December 31; 19^7. Children's Bureau, Wash- 
ington, May. 1950. 5 pp. and 6 tables. Processed. 

Eedl, Fritz, and Wlneman, David: CHILDREN. WHO HATE. The Free Press, 
Glencbe,' 111., 1951. 253 PP. 

A study of a small group of children, with behavior problems, 
which was carried on in an experimental "group therapy heme" 
over a period of nineteen months. The purpose of this study was 
to learn why children's control break down and what can be done to 
prevent and treat such childhood disorganizations. 



- 36 - 

Reld, Joseph H.j and Hagan, Helen R.: RESIDENTIAL TREATMENT OF 

EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY. Child Welfare 
League of America, Inc., Nev York, 1952. 313 PP. 

Describes the operation of 12 treatment institutiona . Con- 
siders forma of organization, intake policies and procedures, 
children in residence, staff tireatment, aftercare, costs, and 
sources of support. 

U. S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Prisons: HANDBOOK OF CORREC- 
TIONAL INSTITUTION DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. The Bureau, Washington, 
■19i^9. 317 pp. 

"A source hook for planning and construction of Institutions 
ranging in type from the small Jail and short term detention facil- 
ities for Juvenile delinqLuents to the maximum security type of 
Institutions." 



Police 



Kahn, Alfred J.: "Functions of Youth Police in an Integrated Community 
Plan for Helping Children In Trouble." JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL 
^SOCIOLOGY, Yol. 24, May 1951, PP. 53^-5^3. 

Considers the role of the various social welfare agencies in 
an Integrated community plan. 

Kahn, Alfred J.: POLICE AND CHILDREN: A STUDY OF TEE JUVENILE AID 
BUREAU OF THE NEW YORK CITY POLICE DEPARTMENT. Citizen's Commlt- 
ttee on Children in Hew York City, Inc., New York, June 1951. 83 pp. 

Describes the background, structure, operation and ca,aeload 
of the Juvenile Aid Bureau, Makes recommendations for strength- 
ening and improving the Bureau's program. 

National Advisory Police Cammlttee to the Federal Security Administrator, 
in consultation with the United States Children's Bureau: TECH- 
NIQUES OF LAW ENFORCEMENT IN TEE TREATMENT OF JUVENILES AND THE 
PREVENTION OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. U. S. Gksv't Print. Off., 
Washington, 19^]., 60 pp. 

"A manual for the guidemce of enforcement officers in deaJ.lng 
with juvenile offenders and in establishing a delinquency prevention 
bureau within the law enforcement agency." 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON ROLE OF POLICE. U. S. Gov't Print. Off ., Washington, 
191^7. 30 pp. 



- 37 - 

Probation and Parole 

Allen, Robert M.: "A Review of Parole Prediction Literature." JOURNAL 
OF CRIMINAL LAW AOT) CRIMINOLOGY, Vol. 32, Jan. -Feb. 19^2, pp. 5^- 

A review of the studies of Burgess, Tibbltts, Glueck, and fold 
on parole success prediction. 

Beard, Belle B.: JUVENILE PROBATION. American Book Co., New York, 
193^. 219 pp. 

An ai^alysls of the case records of 500 childi^n studied at the 
Judge Baker Guidance Clinic and placed on probation in the Juve- 
nile Court in Boston. Discusses probation in relation to the home 
life of the delinquent, companionship, recreation, work, education, 
and physical and mental health. Considers various ways of treating 
and preventing delinq.uency. 

Blanshard, Paul: and Lukas, Edwin J.: PROBATION AND PSYCHIATRIC CARE 
FOR ADOLESCENT OFFENDERS IN NEW YORK CITY. Society for the Pre- 
■ vent ion of 'Crioe, New York, 19J^2. 100 pp. 

Analyzes the probation and psychiatric services in four courts 
in New York City and presents a constructive program for improving 
these services . 

Dressier, David: PROBATION AND PAROLE. Colvunbia University Press, 
New Tork, 1951. 237 pp. - - 

Considers the philosophy, administration, and processes in pro- 
bation and parole. Designed expecially for the use of social 
workers., probation and parole officers, and administrators in 
the correctional field. 

National Probation Association; PROBATION AND PAROLE PROGRESS. YEAR- 
BOOK, 191^1. Marjorie Bell, ed. The Association, New York, 19^1- 
470 pp. 

Includes: The Social Baclcground of Probation and Parole, by 
Wilbur LaRoe, Jr.; Probation and Parole in Relation to the State 
Public Welfare System, by Marietta Stevenson; Dependency and Ne- 
glect Cases in the Juvenile Court, by Agnes K. Hanna; Social Case 
Work In the Field of Juvenile Probation, by Helen Leland Witmer; 
The Youth Correction Authority Act, by Joseph N. Ulman; Experimental 
Group Tre?itment of Maladjusted School Children, by Harry Manuel 
Shttlman; and Using the Group in Probation Work, by Amedeo W. Talano. 

Ohlln, Lloyd E.: SELECTION FOR PAROLE: A MANUAL OF PAROLE PREDICTION. 
Russell Sag© Foundation, New York, 1951. 1^3 PP. 

A report on the develojm^nt of the Illinois methods of selection 
for parole based on 20 years of study and experiment in Illinois. 



STATK Ajm LOCAl OEGABIZATIOH FOE DttlNQBEMPY CONTEOL 

^y 1 " Washington, 19J+7. 54 pp. 

Washington, 191^7. 17 pp ^ * ''* ^°* ^^°^ ^' ^' ^o^'t Print. Off., 

Vol. 86, Oct. WSJ. pp? 43^38!^ "^ ProUems . ■■ srawY, 



- 38 



- 39 - 

Dumpson, James Huesell: "A Conanunlty Approach to Juvenile Delinquency." 
• SOCIAL WORK IN ifiE CUREENT SCENE, SELECTED PAPERS, 76th ANNUAL 

MEETING, NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF SOCIAL W0RK,19^9. Columbia University 
Press, New York, 1950. pp. 302-313. 

A report on the Central Harlem Street Clubs Project, ■ 

Elllngston, Joim'R.^: PROTECTING OUR CHZLTREN FROM CRIMINAL CAREERS. 
Prentice-Hall, Inc ,,' New York, 19U8. JJ^ pp. 

Anklyzes current trends in oriminology with special emphasis on 
pr«Vehtlon and individualized treatment of the offender and the 
role of the ccamaunity in meeting the problem of delinquency. Out- 
lines the fundamental principles and procedures of the Model Youth 
Correction Authority Act made public in 19^0, and the basic features 
of state" legislation, incorporating these principles, enacted in 
California in 19^1, Minnesota and Wisconsin in 19^7, and Massachusetts 
in I9U8. Describes in detail the California Youth Authority program. 

Elllngston, John R.: Leglns, Peter: and Beck, Bertram: "Is the Youth 
Authority Idea Really Paying Off?" PROCEEDINGS OF THE FORTY -SEVENTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF JUVENILE AGENCIES, Vol. 
i+7, 1951. pp. 73-102. 

Discusses and appraises-the ideas behind the Youth Authority pro- 
gram and examines the program in action in the five states where 
Authority legislation has been, enacted. 

Holton, Karl: "California Youth Authority^. Eight Years of Action " 
JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY, Vol. ^+1, May -June, 1950. 

PP- 1-23. . . 

An account by the cliailhnan and director' of the Authority. 

iBsler, Anne Roller: "The Youth' Authority Way." THE SURVEY. May 
1951, 87:206-10 

An illustrated account of the program and operation of the 
■ California Youth Authority'. 

Minnesotat, Youth Conservation Commission: PROGI^S REPORT. The 
Commission, St. Paul, July 1, 1950. 

National Conference on Prevention and Control of Juvenile Delinquency: 
REPORT ON CCMMUNITY COORDINATION. 31 pp. ' 

REPORT ON GENERAL RECOMMENIATIONS FOR STATE AND COMMUNITY ACTION. 11 pp, 
U. S. Gov't Print. Off., Washington, 19^*8. 

New York City Youth Board: PATTERN FOS PREVENTION. The Board, New 
York, 1952. 32 pp. , ■ 

An illustrated booklet describing the program of the New York 
City Youth Board and telling what has been accomplished during its 
first fire years. 



- ko - 

New York State Youth Commission: TEAMWORK CAN PPEVENT DELINQUENCY. . . 
A GUIDE FOR COMMUNITY ACTION TO PREVENT JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. The 
Commisalon, Albany, 1952. 21 pp. 

Stone, Sybil A.: Castendyck, Elsa: and Hanson, Harold B.: CHILDREN 
IN THE COMMUNITY: THE ST. PAUL EXPERIMENT IN CHILD WELFARE. (C.B. 
Pub. No. 317) U. S. Ggy't Print. Off., Washington, 19^6. l82 pp. 

An experimental project carried on by th© Social Service Division 
of the Children's Bureau in cooperation with local public and pri- 
vate agencies in order to study ways of discovering and treating 
children with behavior dlf f lotiltlee . Includes case material showing 
the types of cases and situations dealt with. 

Texas, State Youth Development Council: THE COMMUNITY, THE STATE, AND 
THE DELINQUENT CHILD: A HANDBOOK FOR USE BY JUVENILE COURTS, JUDGES, 
PROBATION OFFICERS, AND OTHERS INTERESTED IN THE TREATMENT AND PRE- 
VENTION OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. The Council, Austin, 1950. 83 pp. 



Bibliographies 

Bennett, Chester C: "Problem Children, Delinquency, and Treatment." 
REVIEW OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH, Vol. 10, Dec. 19l<-0. pp. i^l+O-449. 
A review of literature for the period I936 -- July 19V0. 

Brictanan, William W.: "Causes and Cures of Juvenile Delinquency." 
SCHOOL AND SOCIETY, Vol. 75, June 28,1952. pp. I+05-UII. 

A review of literature on Juvenile delinquency published during 
the period 19^^9-1952. 

Brickman, William W.: "Juvenile Delinquency." SCHOOL AND SOCIETY, 
Vol. 68, Oct. 30, 19^8. pp. 305-311. 

An analysis of literature in the field of Juvenile delinquency 
published during the period from 1945-1948. 

Cabot, P. S. de Q.: JUVENILE DELINQUENCY: A CRITICAL ANNOTATED 
BIBLIOGRAPHY. H. W-. Wilson Co., New York, 19^6. 166 pp. 
The references cover the period 1914-1944. 

Ingram, Christine P., and Kvaraceus, William C: "Selected References 
from the Literature on Except ienal Children." ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
JOURNAL, Vol. 52, Apr. 1952. pp. 471-482. 

Includes a section on Juvenile delinquency, pp. 480-481. A list 
of annotated references on Juvenile delinquency appears in this 
publication each year, generally in the April issue. 



- 1^1 - 

National Probation and Parole Association: A SELECTED READING LIST. 
The Association, New York, 1951. 23 pp. 

A selected list of "books, pamphlets, and periodicals on Juvenile 
delinquency and related subjects , 

Otto, Margaret M.: "Juvenile Delinquency: A Pamphlet Li at." WJLSON 
LIBRAEY BULLETIN, New York, Vol. 23, Jan. 191*9. I>p. 381*-391* 

Tompkins, Dorothy Campbell: SOUECES FOR THE STUDY OF THE ADMINISTRATION 
OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE. California State Board of. Correct lone-, Sacra- 
mento, 19*^9. 29^- pp'. 

Includes nunwrous references relating to Juvenile delinquency and 
to correctional programs for delinquent children. 

United Nations, Department of Social Affaire: "Current Periodical Lit- 
erature: Juvenile Delinquency and Maladjustment." INTERNATIONAL 
REVIEW OF CRIMINAL POLICY, No. 1, Jan. 1952. pp. 109-118. 

References for periodical literature, dcmeetlc and foreign, during 
the period Jan, 1950 to June 1951. 

United Nations, Department of Social Affairs: "Recent Publications: 
Juvenile Belinquency and Maladjustment. " INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF 
CRIMirAL POLICY j No. 2, July 1952. pp. iSO-lS?. 

References to recent publications, dcmeetlc and foreign, for the 
most pa,rt ordy those appearing since the beglnniiig of 1950. Includes 
references to reviews of the ptiblications . 

U. S, Department of Justice^ Federal Bureau of Investigation: BIBLI- 
OGRAPHY' JUVanZiE DELII,'^TJi;NCY AND CRIME CONTROL, The Bureau, 
Washington, 19.^0. 21 pp„ Processed. 

Includea referencos on control of delinquenoy, case histories, 
crime control, aiid studies in Juvenile deliniuency. 

Wagner, Allan H.: PROBATION; A SELECTED BI3LI0GPAPHY ON THE INDI- 
VIDUALIZED TREATfOT OF TEE OFFENDER. Russell Sage Foundation, 
New York, 19^8. 12 pp. 



AUTHOR INDEX 



Abtott,- Grace, 23 
Abels on, Harold H, 20 
Abrahamsen, David, I 
Alchhom, August, 32 
Alexander, Franz, 8 • 
Allaman, Richard, 30 
Allen, Robert M., 37 
Alper, Benedict S., l6, 34 
Applegate, Melbourne S., l8 
Argov, Walter Webster, 32 
Arnold, Mildred, k 
Ash, Philip, 33 
Axelrad, Sidney, 10 

Balistrleri, James J, 13 

Banay, Rali*i S., 1,30 

Barker, Gordon H., 8 

Barnes, Harry Elmer, 23 

Bates, Sanford, 38 

Beard, Belle B., 37 

Beck, Bertram M., 3,31,33,38,39 

Beckham, Walter H., 28 

Bell, Marjorie, ed., 3,4,25,30,37 

Bender, Lauretta, 26 

Bennett, Chester C, kO 

Berg, Renee, 33 

Betke, Mary Angela, 13 

Bettelheim, Bruno, 21,23,33 

Bialosky, Lottie, 25 

BiriceneSB, Valborg, 13 

Black, Bertram J . , 33 

Blanshard, Paul, 37 

Blessing, Leo B., 3 

Bloch, Herbert A., 30 

Bloodgood, Ruth S., 33 

Bodin, Nathan, 20 

Bogen, David, 8 

Book, Dorothy L., k 

Bosvell, Charles H. 4 

Bovet, L., 8 

Bower, Eli M., 20 

Bowlby, John, 8jl3 

Bovler, Alida C, 33 

Boynton, Paul L., 13 

Briclonan, William W., 40 

Brill, Jeanette G., 28 

Bronner, Augusta F., 21,26,27 

Burgees, Ernest W., 3,8 



Burt, Cyril, 9 

Cabot, P. S. de Q., l6,40 

California Youth Authority, 38 

Carr, Lowell Juilliard, 2,l6 

Carr-Saunders, A.M. 9 

Carroll-Abbing, John Patrick, I8 

Casey, Roy, 3 

Castendyck, Elsa, 3,20,38 

Children's Bureau, U. S. Department 
of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare, 1,7,23,28,33,38 

Chomyak, John, 25 

Chute, Charles L., 30 
. Citizens' Committee on Children of 
New York City, 20 

Clendenen, Richard, 34 

Close, Kathryn, 32,38 

Cohen, Frank J., 34 

Cohen, Louis D., 4 

Collis, Arthur T., 9 

Cook, Katherine M., 35 

Cornell, Ethel L., 20 

Costello, John B., 2 

Cox, Rachel Dunaway, 20 

Crawford, Paul L., I8 

Davidoff, Eugene, 26 

DeBoer, Louis, 2 

Delierneux, Adolphe, 30 

Despert, J. Louise, 1 

Deutsch, Albert, 34 

Diggs, Mary Huff, 30 

Dlrksen, Cletus, 9 

Dobbs, Harrison Allen, l6,20,31 

Doll, Edgar A., l4 

Doniger, Simon, 1 

Dooling, James H., 31 

Doshay, Lewis Jacob, 27 

Dressier, David, 37 

Dumpson, James Russell, l8,39 

Dunaeff, Dorothy, 25 

Dunning, Catherine E., 18 

Durea, M. A., l4 

East, W. Norwood, 9 
Eissler, K. R., 24 
Eliot, Martha M., 3 
Ellingston, John R., 39 



42 



- 1^3 - 



Elliott, Mabel A., 2 
Emery, Margaret A., 25 

Fearing, Franklin, '4- 
Felix, R. H., l6- 
Ferguson, ThoinaB, 9 
Fertman, M. H., iV 
Fitcb> KathrynA., 14 
Frankel, Emil, 29 
Frledlander, Kate, 2k 
Fry, Margery, 2 - ' ' 

Galdston, lago, 2 

Gwdner, George E., 3,27,29 

Garrison, Karl C, 2 

Geleer,. Peter, 25 

Gersten, Charles, 3^ 

Gittons, Mary L., l6 

Gilpin, EUth, 2 

Glttins, John, 3^ 

Glide, Selma J., 33 

Glickman, Sylvia, 1^^ 

Gluclanan, Eobert U., 2k 

Glueck, Eleanor T., 2,9,10,17,27,3^ 

Glueck, Sheldon, 9,10,17,27,3^ 

Goldberg, Harriet L., 29 .;■, 

Goldman, Julia, 35 

Goodykoontz, Bess, 21 ' . 

Gough, Harrison G., 10 ..■. .; 

Grant, Pryor M., 29 ' '. ;: •• • 

Griffiths, William, 20 • ■ 

Habbe, Stephen, 3^ . ': '■• ■ 

Hagan, Helen P., 36 . . 

Hall, Gladys E., 25 ,. ; ,. 

Halpern, Irving W., 26 .' ■ . 

Hanna, Agnes K., 37 

Hanson, Harold B., ^0 

Harris, Dale B., 15 

Harrison, Leonard V., 29, 31 . •.-. 

Hart, Henry Harper, 10 

Hartl, Emil M., 15 - . : ■ 

Haydon, Edward, 25 ,■ •: ' 

Healy, William, 8,21,27,3^ ■■ • • 

Hedges, Puth B., k ' . ,■ • -• 

Hendry, Charles E., 3 

Henry, Nelson B., ed., 21 

Hlrsch, Nathaniel D. M., 10 

Hirechberg, Pudolf, 1 

Hodges, Margaret B., ed., 5 

Hoffman, L. Wallace, 25 r 



Holt on, Karl, 39 
Hoyles, J. Arthur, 2k 
Huffman, Arthur V., 15 
Hunt, J. McV., ed., 2k 

Ingram, Christine P., 35>'*0 
International Committee of the Howard 

League for Penal Reform, 29 
IsBler, Anne Poller, 39 

James , Arthur W . , 3 
Jenkins, P. L. ll+,2l+ 
Johnson, Harry C, 13 
Johnson, Lillian J., ^ 
Johnston, Florence S., 28 
Joint Advisory Committee of the Har- 
lem Project J Research Committee, 21 
Jones, Harold E., k 

Kahn, Alfred J., 1^,19,21,36 
Keith -Lucas, Alan, 28 
Killlan, Frederic W., 2 
Kneisel, Stephan H., 3 
Konopka, Glsela, 35 
Kotinsky, Ruth, l8 
Krause, Lawrence J., 35' 
Kvaraceus, William C, 21, 40 

LaPoe, Wilbui-, Jr., 37 
Larson, John Farr, 29 
Laycock, S. P., 21 ■ 
Leglns, Peter, 39 
Lenroot, Katharine F., 31 
Lenz, Henry, 25 
Lenz, Marjorie Wallace, 25 
Leonard, Charles W., l+,35 
Lesser, Edith K.,31 
Levy, Ruth Jacobs, 29 , 
Lippman, H. S., 24 ; 
Long, Harvey L., 3 
Lowrey, LawsonG., l**- 
Ludwig, Frederick J., 26 
Lukas, Edwin J., k,31 
Lunden, Walter A., 3,10 

MacCormick, Austin H., 2,31 
MacKay, William N., 1^ 
MacNeil, Douglas H., 3 
McClusky, Howard Y., 21 
McDermotte, Eugene, 15 ,. 
McDonald, Jamee F., 15 



kh 



McHugh, Thomas J., '+ 

McKay, Henry D., 2,15 

McNickle, Eoma K., 24 

Malamud, Daniel I., l8 

Mann, Cecil W,, lif 

Mann, Helene Powner, ik 

Mannheim, Hermann, 9 

Martens, Ellse H., 7. 35 ' 

Melson, ESXwoodF., 4 

Merrill, Maud A., l4 

Mldcentury White House Conference 

on Children and Youth, 5>25 
Mlddleton, Warren C, l4 
Mlhanovlch, Clement S., 3 
Minnesota Youth ConsQ^yftSlOnr 

CommlsBlon, 19,39 
Monachesl, Ello D., 15 
Moore, Maurice E., 13 
Morrison, Lawrence D,, 3,^ 
Mullen, Fiftnces A., 21 
Muntz, Harold R., it- 
Murphy, Fred J., 7 

National Conference on Prevention 
and Control of Juvenile Delin- 
quency, 3,7,17,21,25,30,32,35, 
36,39. 

National Probation Association, 3, 
25,37 

National Protatlon and Parole 
Association, l4-,30,32,Ul 

National Society for the Study of 
Education, 21 

Ness, Eliot, 3 

Neumeyer, Martin H., 10,17 

New York City Youth Board, 17,39 

New York State Board of Social 
Welfare, 10 

New York State Youth Coranission, 22,lt-0 

Noetzel, Elinor S . , 26 

Norman, Helen, 32 

Norman, Sherwood, 1,2,32 

Nutt, Alice Scott, 25,30 

Obers, Samuel J., 35 
Odoroff, M. E., 15 
Ohlln, Lloyd E., 37 
Otto, MergaretM., kl 
Oursler, Fulton, 19 
Oursler, Will, 19 



Page, Leo, 10 

Payne, E, George, 28 

Pearce, J. D. W., 1+ 

Peck, Harris B,, 25 

Pennsylvania. Joint State Government 
Commission. Suhcommittee on 
Juvenile Delinquency and Child 
Welfare, 17 

Perlman, I. Richard, 31,35 

Peterson, Donald R., 10 

Philadelphia Conference for the 
Prevention and Control of 
Juvenile Delinquency, 17 

Phillips, Orie L., 30 ' '■• 

Poller, Justine Wise., i|-,30 

Poole, Vera E., 9 

Porterfleld, Austin L., l8, 30 ' 

Powers, Edwin, 2,19,22 

Rappaport, Mazie F., 28 

Reckless, Walter C, 5,11,25 

Redl, Fritz, 11,20,25,35 

Reid, Joseph H., 36 

Reinemann, John Otto, 6,30,31 

Reiss, Albert J., Jr., 11 

Rhodes, E. C, 9 

Rohlnson, Bruce B., 20 

Rohinson, Duane, 19 

Rohison, Sophia M., 7 

Rogers, Carl R., 27 

Romalis, Frieda, 3 

Romano, Fred A., 3 

Rosenthal, Pauline, 28 

Roser, Mark, k 

Ross, Mahel, 11 ' " 

Rubin, Sol, 11 

Sanders, Wiley Britton, 31 
Sassin, Edmond F., 3 
Schramm, Gustav L., 2,30 
Schwartz, Edward E., 2,7 
Sellln, Thorsten, 7 
Seymour, H. C, 22 ■ ' 
Shanas, Ethel, 19 ' 
Shaw, Clifford R., 11,12 
Sheldon, William H., 15 
Shirley, Mary M.,,7 
Shulman, Hart-y Manuel, 2 ,12,37 
Simon, Abraham L., 25 
Slavson,S. R., l,h,26 



^^5 



Slawson, John, 12 
Smith, Anna Kalet, 28 
Smith, Mapheue, 5 
Smith, Philip M., 22 
Smith, Richard T., k 
Smyth, George W., 31 
Solomon, Ben, I8 
Spelke, Max, 3 
Stevenson, Marietta, 37 
Steward, V. Lome, 3 
Stocks, Percy, 9 
Stone, Sybil A., li-O 
Stott, D. H., 5,12 
Strang, Ruth, 21 
Strong, Harold F., 3 
Sussman, Frederick B., 31 
Suasman, Sarat, 35 

Taher, Robert C, 3,31 
Taft, Donald R., 5 
Tglano, Amedeo W., 37 
Tappan, Paul W., 2,6,26,31 
TeeterB, Negley K., 6,23,26 
Texas, State Youth Developnent 

Council, kO 
Thom, Jouglae A., 28 
Thrasher, Frederick M., 12,19 
Thurston, Henry W., 6 
Tolman, Ruth 3., 32 
Tompkins, Dorothy Campbell, 1+1 
Towle, Charlotte, 12 

Ullmann, Charles A., 22 

ULman, Joseph N., 37 

United Nations Department of Social 
Affaire, Division of Social 
Welfare, 6,1+1 

United Nations Educational, Scientif- 
ic, and Cultural Organization, 12 

U. S. Congress, Senate, Conmittee on 
Education and Labor, Subconmittee 
on Wartime Health and Education, 6 



U. 



U. 



U. 



U. 



S. Congress. Special Committee to 

Investigate Organized Crime in 

Interstate Commerce, 6 

S. Department of Health, Educatlot. 

and Welfare. Office of Education. 

7,22 

S. Department of Justice, Bureau 
of Prisons, 36 

S. Department of Justice, Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, If 



7an Waters, Miriam, 21 
Veney, Laweon J., 3 
Tolz, Horace S., 22 

Wagner, Allan H., 1+1 

Wales, Ralph G., 32 

Wallerstein, James S . , l 

Walsworth, Barrier M., I3 

Wattenberg, William W., 13 

Weston, Helen E., 25 

White House Conference on Child Health 
and Protection. Committee on So- 
cially handicapped-Delinquency. 6 

Whyte, William F., 13 "^ ^ > ^ 

Wiener, Jack, 35 

Wiers, Paul, 13 

Wilkins, William D., 19 

Williams, Herbert D., 31 

Wlneman, David, 25,35 

Wltmer, Helen Leland, 18.19 28 ^7 

Wltte, ErnestF., k ^'^""'^f 

Wittman, Mary Phyllis, 15 

Wollan, Kenneth I., 31 

Wright, Robert R., l4 

Wylegala, Victor B., 28 

Young, H. T. P., 9 
Young, Leontine R., 18 
Young, Pauline 7., 7 

Zuck, John M., 30